Search Results: "Robin E. Levin"


BOOK REVIEW

THE DEATH OF CARTHAGE by Robin E. Levin
Released: Dec. 6, 2011

"Intricately described, well-plotted historical fiction set in ancient Rome."
Levin's novel blends the history of the Second and Third Punic Wars with a richly detailed peek into ancient Roman culture. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

E by Matt Beaumont
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2000

"Your career may depend on it."
Subject: Fab debut of former London adman, making a bugger-all brilliant update on the epistolary novel by having it largely in e-mail thrashing about on the office network and focusing on London's Miller Shanks ad agency striving to land the Coke account. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STE-E-E-E-EAMBOAT A-COMIN’! by Jill Esbaum
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 8, 2005

"The Story of Captain Blanche Leathers (2000), illus by Holly Meade, though its content is closer to William Anderson's comparatively restrained River Boy (2003), illus by Dan Andreasen. (afterword, map) (Picture book. 7-9)"
Inspired by a passage from Mark Twain's Life on the Mississippi, Esbaum captures the bustle and commotion attending a steam packet's arrival in a small river town: "Rubberneckers, / pounding boots, / whiskered geezers, big galoots. / Wheels a-clatter, / choking cloud, / yapping dog, excited crowd." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

COCK ROBIN by Barbara Cooney
Released: Oct. 1, 1965

"In the 19th century, historians of education say, Cock Robin was acted out by school children."
Who killed Cook Robin? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROBIN HOOD by Margaret Early
adapted by Margaret Early, illustrated by Margaret Early
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: June 1, 1996

"Read this copy indoors with velvet gloves on, and save Howard Pyle's classic telling to read outside under the trees. (Picture book/folklore. 10+)"
Early (Sleeping Beauty, 1993, etc.) now adds the tales of Sir Robin to her artistic retellings of classics. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOMER AND THE HOUSE NEXT DOOR by Robin Pulver
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"A funny story about the anxieties of moving from the author of the Mrs. Toggle books. (Fiction/Picture book. 4-7)"
Homer the dog feels ``disgusted'' when he hears that his friend Mrs. Gallivant is moving from the house next door—he'll miss her biscuits, the tennis balls she threw for him, the shade tree in her yard. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROBIN HOOD by David Calcutt
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2012

"Sure to attract new followers for a perennially popular hero. (research and bibliography) (Folklore. 9-13)"
Robbing the rich and punishing the privileged, Robin Hood and his band return in a series of nine episodes gracefully retold and beautifully designed to appeal to modern readers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

The Robin Stories by Heide Koenitzer Clark
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 3, 2015

"A novel about a novelist that's short on plot but long on character development."
In Clark's (Monsignor, 2014) latest work of fiction, a college senior defies his parents in his quest to write the next Great American Novel.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOW ROBIN SAVED SPRING by Debbie Ouellet
ADVENTURE
Released: April 1, 2009

"But Ceccoli supplies some beautifully Renaissance compositions and a lovely pale palette that modulates beautifully from winter to spring, which compensate pretty well for narrative weaknesses. (Picture book. 5-8)"
An original pourquoi tale presents Lady Winter, who's distinctly reluctant to yield to slumbering Sister Spring, and a bevy of animals who work to thwart her. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROBIN HOOK, PIRATE HUNTER! by Eric A. Kimmel
ADVENTURE
Released: March 1, 2001

"There's lots of mischief and fun here, but its hero simply can't measure up to its villains. (Picture book. 5-8)"
What do you get when you mix Robin Hood with Peter Pan, and throw in a dash of The Lord of the Flies? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

E-MAIL by Stephanie D. Fletcher
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 30, 1996

"Long, bland stretches alternate with vulgar, hyperexplicit sexual confessions: a cheap, easy, and convincing glimpse of modern American cybersex—for what that may be worth."
Non-initiates to the communications revolution can now enjoy cyber-romance on the printed page—thanks to this epistolary first novel by a North Carolina writer. Read full book review >