Search Results: "Robin Nagle"


BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 19, 2013

"Sure to garner newfound respect for an essential yet greatly underappreciated workforce."
A deserving profile of the hardworking folks who work a particularly dirty job. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 28, 2011

"Thoughtful, well-intended grandfatherly advice, well worth a bent ear."
In this collection of epistolary essays, Nagle ruminates on a meaningful, enjoyable life, gradually accreting pearls of wisdom. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GLORIETA by P.G. Nagle
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"Others may find it slow going."
A Confederate Army, assembled in Texas in 1862, invaded the Union Southwest, intending to slice its way through to the Pacific and seize California. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GUNS OF VALVERDE by P.G. Nagle
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2000

"Lively, compelling historical fiction."
Nagle's Glorieta Pass (1998) traced the early successes of the Confederate Army that was sent, in 1862, to seize the American Southwest for the Rebel cause. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RED RIVER by P.G. Nagle
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2003

"Historical fiction stretched as tight as good gray Confederate cloth."
Fourth chorus in Nagle's Civil War epic focusing on the Confederacy in the Southwest, following Galveston (2002), Glorieta Pass (1999) and The Guns of Valverde (2000). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GALVESTON by P.G. Nagle
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2002

"Nagle fictionalizes some naval encounters but keeps a gripping pace without striving for the grand and glorious."
Third historical in Nagle's ongoing saga of Confederates in the Southwest, following Glorietta Pass (1998) and The Guns of Valverde (2000). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FREAKY STUFF by Richard Tulloch
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2007

"Aside from an earnest, unconvincing screed about violence on TV, this otherwise nonstop romp, which is strewn with faux-crude ink drawings done on torn loose-leaf (plus a set of small flip-page images), is perfectly tuned to its intended middle-grade audience. (Fiction. 9-11)"
In a second round of droll ups and downs, Brian, the young narrator of Weird Stuff (2006), struggles to cope with his little brother Matthew's total identification with a crew of kickboxing zombie fighters on a new TV show. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WEIRD STUFF by Richard Tulloch
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2006

"Tulloch shoehorns in so many subplots, extraneous characters and earnest passages of creative writing advice that the tale seems overstuffed, but aspiring young writers, at least, will appreciate Brian's epiphany. (Fiction. 11-13)"
A lad discovers that the path to greater self-esteem is paved with Words in this angst-ridden, occasionally funny import. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A CHICKEN FOLLOWED ME HOME! by Robin Page
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 19, 2015

"A delightful and informative book for families wanting to raise chickens or learn where eggs come from. (Informational picture book. 4-9)"
In her first foray as solo writer and illustrator, Page, Steve Jenkins' frequent collaborator (and spouse), presents a child-friendly Q-and-A to prepare children for the titular eventuality. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I USED TO BE THE BABY by Robin Ballard
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2002

"Though this child is meant to be a model, he seems more patient and helpful than many children would be. (Picture book. 2-6)"
This effort would fall into the "new sibling issues" category, the premise laid out on the first page, "I used to be the baby, but now I am big. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE NIGHTWOOD by Robin Muller
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 18, 2010

"Tamer than the virulent version by Jane Yolen and Charles Mikolaycak (Tam Lin, 1990), this does not include Elaine's pregnancy, instead relying on the artwork to picture her pining away for her love. (Folktale. 7-10)"
In this lush retelling of the Celtic tale of Tam Lin, the daughter of the Earl of March is drawn by music to the forest that has become the home of the dreaded Elfin Queen. Read full book review >