Search Results: "Roger G. Kennedy"


BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 1999

"Kennedy is no Gore Vidal, yet, in an engaging and lightly ironic tone, he offers a worthwhile portrait of powerful politicians in early America. (30 photos) (First printing of 40,000; Book-of-the-Month Club and History Book Club alternate selections; author tour)"
In a study of three Founders, Kennedy, director emeritus of the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History and a prolific author (Hidden Cities, 1994, etc.), demonstrates his devotion to underdogs, in particular Aaron Burr. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 14, 1994

"Best read as an exploration of colliding cultures rather than an examination of the riddles left behind by Native American builders."
Kennedy, director of the National Park Service, does better in exposing the prejudices of whites who came across the monuments of prehistoric America than in elucidating the mysteries embodied in these New World Stonehenges. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ORDERS FROM FRANCE by Roger G. Kennedy
Released: May 30, 1989

Kennedy, director of the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History and author of Architecture, Men, Women, and Money in America (1986), analyzes the myriad connections between France and America in the several decades after those countries' revolutions. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 2003

"Fresh, endlessly fascinating, and altogether extraordinary."
A sweeping, continent-wide reinterpretation of early US history from Kennedy (Burr, Hamilton, and Jefferson, 1999, etc.), who replaces individualist heroes such as Daniel Boone with economic movements, transcontinental forces, and unintended consequences. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

G. by John Berger
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 8, 1972

"Ultimately (and ignoring the common reader whom it will defeat) it is an arresting, inordinately vital, impersonal, and remarkable work."
G. as anonymously archetypal as the use of the initial suggests, is the novel or rather anti-novel of the prominent British art critic and Marxist humanist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

G-SPOT by Noire
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 25, 2005

"Raunchy and rough, but it moves."
Payback time for a good girl gone bad. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

G-REX by Teri Daniels
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2000

"The story isn't messy like life, it is just aimless, and Pearson's artwork is too frail a scaffolding to give this shapeless narrative any structure. (Picture book. 5-8)"
A little brother gets a chance to be as teasing and bullyish as his big brother in this bit of purposeless wish-fulfillment. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROGER AILES by Zev Chafets
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 19, 2013

"No matter where readers are on the political spectrum, this light biography is a tantalizing look into the life of a man who altered the TV-news landscape."
A chatty look into the life and motivations of Fox News founder Roger Ailes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ADVENTURE
Released: Aug. 1, 2005

"With the blessing,' the next Jacky adventure will come along soon. (Fiction. YA)"
The third installment—"and the Dear knows"—of Jacky Faber, now back in England and pressed into ship service despite being all girl and all of 15. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE KENNEDY CHRONICLES by Kennedy
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 30, 2013

"Mildly entertaining but superficial and unremarkable."
One of the original video jockeys waxes nostalgic on her time with the MTV network. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SMALL G by Patricia Highsmith
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2004

"Aimless and uninteresting tale that would have been best left to the archives."
A meandering story of gay and straight life in modern Zurich, the last fiction by Highsmith (Nothing That Meets the Eye, 2002, etc.) before her death in 1995. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

G IS FOR ONE GZONK! by Tony DiTerlizzi
ABC BOOKS
Released: Sept. 12, 2006

"Fans of If I Ran the Zoo (1950), or silly alphabets in general, will delight in tracking the burgeoning chaos while trying to wrap their tongues around the droll monikers of this manic menagerie. (Picture book. 6-8)"
In memorable homage to his dedicatees Dr. Seuss and Edward Lear, DiTerlizzi introduces an unruly alphabet of imaginary "creachlings," colored in flat hues to evoke the printing processes of the previous century's middle decades and described in sprightly verse. Read full book review >