Search Results: "Roger Leroy Miller"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 27, 1991

"Perfectly reasoned: sophistry and paste."
Come now two professors, economics and law, to join the ranks of self-styled experts on the drug scourge in America. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHARKEY'S KID by Leroy Ostransky
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 22, 1991

"Old home-feelings all on a dead level with no rising action- -but some elders will welcome this seedcake."
Jewish nostalgia, Manhattan style. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EARTHBOUND by Dee LeRoy
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 15, 2014

"A stunning poetic debut."
With her first collection, LeRoy delivers luminous, art-inspired poems that expertly balance the concepts of nature and the human struggle. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SOLDIER'S WIFE by Margaret Leroy
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 28, 2011

"Vivienne's measured, astringent voice is riveting and her moral ambiguity deliciously disturbing until the disappointingly maudlin ending."
Leroy, whose fiction specializes in prickly mothers, turns from the paranormal (Yes, My Darling Daughter, 2009, etc.) to the historical in this story of torn loyalties during the World War II German occupation of the isle of Guernsey. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

MARY MILLER
by Stephanie Buschardt

Despite its title, there’s not a lot of happiness going around in Mary Miller’s new collection, Always Happy Hour. “There is nothing more disgusting, really, than people enjoying themselves so thoroughly when you’re miserable,” writes Miller in the book’s opening story, a rather grim yet appropriate introduction to the morbid hilarity that’s to come in the following pages. More ...


Read the full post >

BOOK REVIEW

THE RIVER HOUSE by Margaret Leroy
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 21, 2005

"Old-fashioned, realistic fiction that aims to challenge rather than mollify."
English writer Leroy's serious, delicately composed second (after Postcards from Berlin, 2003) presents an unhappy London wife and mother with a moral dilemma. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SAME OLD STORY by William LeRoy
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Oct. 16, 2013

"An engaging thriller that highlights the universality of love."
An Internet-age murder mystery with a modern edge. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PRAYERS FOR BOBBY by Leroy Aarons
NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1995

"Glumly informative in tone and only intermittently affecting, though Aarons effectively drives home the sad point that Bobby's death is only one in an avoidable epidemic of gay teen suicides. (photos, not seen)"
An earnestly didactic case study about homophobia. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HEART IS DECEITFUL ABOVE ALL THINGS by J.T. LeRoy
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2001

"Strong, fierce, hard, and frankly astonishing."
LeRoy (Sarah, 2000) is something of a boy wonder—or horror, as the case may be. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

POSTCARDS FROM BERLIN by Margaret Leroy
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 11, 2003

"British author Leroy's US debut starts strong, creating delicious uncertainty about the heroine, but eventually settles for pat answers and easy romance."
Mother battles the medical establishment when her child comes down with a mysterious illness—in this indictment of the British health care system. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

YES, MY DARLING DAUGHTER by Margaret Leroy
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: April 21, 2009

"Leroy's delicate psychological insight falls to pieces under the weight of solving a preposterous murder mystery."
Leroy (The River House, 2005, etc.), who specializes in delineating the lives of unhappy, not entirely likable British women, describes a young single mother whose child-rearing problems defy mere psychology. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SARAH by J.T. LeRoy
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 2000

"Not exactly a laugh riot, but not as unrelievedly sordid as a plot synopsis might suggest."
Scary, sad, and way, way out there, Leroy's picaresque debut novel follows a young boy through southern truckstops, where "lot lizards" turn tricks for drivers whose tastes run from women to transvestites to boys in jeans. Read full book review >