Search Results: "Roland Barthes"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 1, 1995

"Hardly definitive, then—but endearingly chatty, much in the spirit of Barthes himself."
This first full biography of Roland Barthes (191580) provides a useful overview of the celebrated literary and cultural critic's career, without taking itself too seriously. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A BARTHES READER by Roland Barthes
Released: Aug. 6, 1982

"The signals, then, are decidedly mixed here—Sontag's even more than Barthes'—but all the brilliance and outlandishness (and maybe even the self-destructiveness) of the Barthesian theory is well represented in this compendium."
Sontag has made what seem to be rather conservative—and perhaps revisionist—choices in this sampler of Barthes' work, stressing complete short essays (presumably in the interest of wholeness) over sections of Barthes' longer and more radical works (Writing Degree Zero, S/Z, The Pleasure of the Text, Camera Lucida). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROLAND by Nelly Stéphane
Released: June 15, 1958

"Little Roland has an extraordinary gift with the crayon. In fact, whatever he draws comes to life. A delightful knock, but at times it gets complicated, for outside of his ability to draw poor little children the gifts they could normally not afford, he also threatens his mother with turning her tidy home into a menagerie of animated creatures. Roland compromises in the end, but not until he and his renders have enjoyed an afternoon of most lively Gallic whimsy.</p>"
<p>There is no doubt about it. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: July 13, 1981

"Readers of Susan Sontag's On Photography will find Barthes a gentler, more private, also insinuating voice on the subject."
Nothing is more present or more mysterious, still, than the Photograph—so one blinks only at Barthes' assumption, at the start of these meditations on its nature, that he is doing something exceptional. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

S/Z by Roland Barthes
Released: Sept. 9, 1974

"Barthes has brought new life to a foundering literary aesthetics with this synthesis of science and imaginative humanism, for those familiar with the terminology."
In this essential application of structural linguistics to the problems of literary criticism, Roland Barthes—a disciple of Saussure and one of the cardinal spokesmen of semiology—opposes both the goals and methods of classic rhetoric. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SADE, FOURIER, LOYOLA by Roland Barthes
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 15, 1976

"Not everyone will be willing to trip after him, but this perversely poetic critic does generate a great deal of electricity."
Since the publication of Writing Degree Zero in 1953, Roland Barthes has been creating a body of criticism that alters in an absolute sense our traditional notion of what literature—and indeed what writing itself—is. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Nov. 1, 1984

"Otherwise: intricate, often dazzling intellectual explorations—but too limited by Barthes' theoretical framework to bring real illumination to music or art."
Five of the essays here—including the seminal "The Third Meaning," which is Barthes' semiological prÉcis of the element of "code apperception" independent of a "signified" or a "signifier"—have been published before, in 1977's Image/Music/Text. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PLEASURE OF THE TEXT by Roland Barthes
Released: May 27, 1975

"Not an explication: a striptease revealing what is absolutely new in the art of narrative."
Now that he's set down once and for all time a system of literary structural analysis (S/Z, 1974), what can Barthes possibly do for an encore? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MYTHOLOGIES by Roland Barthes
NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 1972

"The selections, however, are ample, and the translation fine."
Although Mythologies, published 15 years ago in France, may seem a lamentably late arrival on these shores, it is still the gamiest of structuralist studies. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SEMIOTIC CHALLENGE by Richard  Howard
NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 1988

"Reading Barthes the scholar rather than the social critic (though he's freewheelingly campy in both: blasÉ about sources, using lan Fleming's Goldfinger as an exemplary text at one point) is refreshing, and the book—though not for many outside the academy, probably—earns its distinction as such."
Something under half the pieces here are generalized restatements of the uses of semiology—"Sociology and Socio-logic," "Semiology and Urbanism," "Senfiology and Medicine"—that were originally addresses or contributions to omnibus volumes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GRAIN OF THE VOICE by Roland Barthes
NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1984

"And, even if much of the material here is near-comically ingrown and jargoned, with interviewers struggling to duplicate Barthes' vocabulary, some readers will find useful, relatively unforbidding introductions to Barthes' ideas—many of which have not worn well—while devout Barthesians will pore over every word."
Although the late Roland Barthes says at one point here that he does not like giving interviews, this volume contains 39 of them—and still others, according to an editorial note, may also have taken place. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EMPIRE OF SIGNS by Richard  Howard
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1982

"There is more concentrated pleasure here, however—along with fewer stylistic and other impediments—than in major works of the canon."
Brief appreciations of things Japanese, of the "richness, mobility, and subtlety" of the Japanese "exchange of signs": published in France in 1970, and Barthes at his most seductive. Read full book review >