Search Results: "Roland Green"


BOOK REVIEW

ROLAND by Nelly Stéphane
Released: June 15, 1958

"Little Roland has an extraordinary gift with the crayon. In fact, whatever he draws comes to life. A delightful knock, but at times it gets complicated, for outside of his ability to draw poor little children the gifts they could normally not afford, he also threatens his mother with turning her tidy home into a menagerie of animated creatures. Roland compromises in the end, but not until he and his renders have enjoyed an afternoon of most lively Gallic whimsy.</p>"
<p>There is no doubt about it. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 1, 1995

"Hardly definitive, then—but endearingly chatty, much in the spirit of Barthes himself."
This first full biography of Roland Barthes (191580) provides a useful overview of the celebrated literary and cultural critic's career, without taking itself too seriously. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WOLF ROLAND by Julia Cunningham
Released: March 12, 1983

"But like other Cunningham stories of medieval travels, orphans, and the like, it has a frozen, sanctimonious quality."
Cunningham's latest medieval allegory concerns Tegonec, who makes his living with his donkey cart, and the talking wolf who materializes by the roadside and devours his donkey, Fanfare. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GREEN by Jay Lake
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: June 1, 2009

"An action-packed tale."
A stylish and intimate fantasy from Lake (Escapement, 2008, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GREEN by Benjamin Zucker
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2002

"Multiple readings could perhaps yield more insight—not an onerous task since this is one of the more beautiful books in recent memory—but it's difficult to regard Green as anything more than a curio."
The brilliant minds of today and yesteryear crowd into the exquisitely designed pages of this odd folly of an art novel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROLAND WRIGHT, BOOK 1 by Tony Davis
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 8, 2009

"The slightly preachy message about following one's best instincts comes through in this pleasant, undemanding Australian import, first in a series, illustrated with wry humor by Rogers and filled with some interesting details about knights and the Middle Ages. (Historical fiction. 8-11)"
It's 1409, and nine-and-a-half-year-old Roland Wright, son of the best armorer in the kingdom, dreams of becoming a brave knight. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VOYAGE TO ENEH by Roland J. Green
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 1, 2000

"All in all, a promising start."
The first volume of an alien-contact trilogy, from the coeditor (with Lois McMaster Bujold) of Women at War (1995) and author of various Conans, Dragon Lances, and other paperback fantasies. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GREEN by Tom Baker
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 15, 2017

"A sharp and intriguing tale about a gay draftee in the '60s."
A novel tells the story of a gay Army recruit in the Vietnam era. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GREEN by Laura Peyton Roberts
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 12, 2010

"Give this light fare to those graduating out of Magic Tree House and not yet ready for Percy Jackson or Molly Moon. (Fantasy. 9-12)"
Lilybet Green gets something extraordinary for her 13th birthday: the chance to become a leprechaun keeper. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WOMEN AT WAR by Lois McMaster Bujold
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 1995

"Worth a browse for enlightened readers; mandatory for unreconstructed mcps."
A quarter of a century ago, as the editors ruefully admit, this would have been a groundbreaking anthology, composed as it is of 17 ``original military science fiction stories by women writers.'' Still, groundbreaking or not, the proposition is more elastic than it sounds, including several fantasies and one yarn without military significance. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GREEN by Keith C. Clark
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 18, 2014

"A quick, enjoyable read that doesn't spend too much time in the rough."
Clark offers a novel about golf, race and friendship in roughly equal parts. Read full book review >