Search Results: "Ronald Aiken"


BOOK REVIEW

DEATH HAS ITS BENEFITS by Ronald  Aiken
Released: July 31, 2012

"Readers willing to enter an edgy, seamy world will enjoy this dark and fatalistic tale."
In this hard-boiled suspense novel, an unwitting attorney tracks the sleazy underside of New York City into his home, where it infects his marriage and his life. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ADVENTURE
Released: Oct. 28, 2008

"Readers searching for magical chapters and those who have read the author's novels should enjoy these tales. (Short stories. 10-14)"
Gathered under one cover from several Aiken collections, the magical, eccentric and very British Armitage family reappears in a collection of 24 stories, four never before published. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DANGEROUS GAMES by Joan Aiken
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Feb. 1, 1999

"Fans will be happy to see feisty Dido in action again, and while there is foul game afoot, the novel's end finds the clever lass and company in search of yet another adventure. (Fiction. 12-15)"
From Aiken (Cold Shoulder Road, 1996, etc.), a continuation of the sturdy adventures of Dido Twite. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

COLD SHOULDER ROAD by Joan Aiken
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 1996

"What could be more satisfying? (Fiction. 11-15)"
Tempt Bellairs fans with this, or with any of the other adventures descended from The Wolves of Willoughby Chase. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 1, 1992

"In all: a slightly uneven but entertaining collection. (Fiction. 12+)"
Ten tales of tingling terror—well, some tingles and some terror. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A CLUSTER OF SEPARATE SPARKS by Joan Aiken
Released: March 3, 1972

"It's touches such as this, along with the poison gas in the organ, which redeem the essentials (murder; an old love affair; a child who has been kidnapped and may have the remarkable mnemonic gifts of his father which make him wanted by the Chinese — no less) and give it a saving grace for those who read Joan Aiken and Mary Stewart."
Joan Aiken out of period disguise resembles Joan Aiken and Mary Stewart (this takes place on a Greek island where the heroine is accused of reading her) and the story is such an overwhelming overstatement that it's best to focus on the scenery. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE KINGDOM AND THE CAVE by Joan Aiken
Released: March 8, 1974

"Whether one takes Astalon at face value or reads for the witty asides that are buried here and there (the evil governess Miss Simkin came well recommended by the Le Fays) this is an enjoyable if not ground-breaking expedition."
If Joan Aiken chooses to indulge in a Hobbity/Prydainy pastiche one might; expect her to have something more than imitation in mind. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DIED ON A RAINY SUNDAY by Joan Aiken
Released: April 1, 1972

"The ambience is one of proper British horror; but younger readers may find it hard to empathize with Jane's maternal guilt over leaving her children to go back to work (and her resultant passivity) and seasoned mystery fans will know that it would have been good husbandry to send Myfanwy packing the day she broke the Spode teapot."
The ill-concealed hostility of the new household help (the tight-lipped gardener McGregor and his babysitter wife Myfanwy) and her husband Graham's suspicious lack of concern are enough to make Jane increasingly panicky. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LAST MOVEMENT by Joan Aiken
Released: June 10, 1977

"A passing fancy too smooth to pass up."
To heavenly Helikon—a cross between Tanglewood and Jack LaLanne in the Greek isles—come aspiring stage designer "Mike" Meiklejohn, with her recuperating mum, and celebrity-playwright Lady Julia, with her brand-new, sunstroked second husband. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CUCKOO TREE by Joan Aiken
Released: Oct. 1, 1971

Don't aggle at me, gal! Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE EMBROIDERED SUNSET by Joan Aiken
Released: Sept. 25, 1970

"With so much going on, it has lots going for it along with humor and some genuine surprises."
This is a plummy diversion pursued with providential abandon and discarding all the predictables of the genre (Miss Aiken calls it a "light romance") including the happy ending. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GO SADDLE THE SEA by Joan Aiken
Released: Nov. 11, 1977

"Readers addicted to long, undemanding adventures might sail through it, and right on to the next."
In which orphaned young Felix Brooke runs away from his aristocratic grandfather's Spanish estate; is in turn thrown into jail, nearly sacrificed by a pagan community, and kidnapped at sea; encounters many true friends and kindly helpers; and arrives at last at the home of his long-lost, equally aristocratic English grandfather—only to conclude that he belongs back in Spain. Read full book review >