Search Results: "Ronald Kessler"


BOOK REVIEW

LAURA BUSH by Ronald Kessler
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 4, 2006

"Why sully or smash icons when it's so fun to make new ones out of Silly Putty?"
The Bushes are wonderful; the Clintons are not. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1999

"Although Kessler tries to be nonjudgmental, the weight of accumulated anecdote paints a picture of narcissism and decadence that is both pitiable and unsettling. (16 pages photos)"
Money matters in this high-society resort, according to bestselling author Kessler; so do pedigree, the right wardrobe, the right restaurant—and bigotry and misogyny. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 6, 1991

"A fascinating and painstakingly documented footnote to the history of cold-war espionage. (Eight pages of photographs—not seen.)"
The intriguing tale of Vitaly Yurchenko, a KGB colonel who returned to the Soviet Union barely three months after having defected to the US, giving his on-again, off-again masters a considerable propaganda victory. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RONALD REAGAN by Andrew Helfer
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 2007

"Gives credit where due, but not in a manner that is likely to please conservative partisans."
Part primer, part polemic, this graphic biography scratches the surface of what its creators depict as a comic-book presidency. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 1, 1995

"With substance calculated to irritate frustrated taxpayers as much as to entertain, Kessler's tabloid style is effective in enticing the reader to keep turning the pages."
A mixture of juicy but hard-to-verify gossip and anecdotes about presidents from Secret Service agents (sworn never to reveal secrets), White House housekeepers, butlers, maids, and cooks, as well as media figures and politicians. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"A revealing glimpse of an American institution in transition. (Photographs)"
The publisher is trumpeting how Kessler's revelations here of William Sessions's abuses of office led to the former FBI director's dismissal—but those revelations form only one small part of Kessler's comprehensive, largely approving examination of how today's FBI emerged from the shadow of J. Edgar Hoover. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1992

"Lack of historical perspective and of a serious overarching view of the international intelligence community doom this cheery bureaucratic tale to mediocrity. (Eight-page photo insert—not seen.)"
Authorized history of the CIA, by Kessler (Escape from the CIA, 1991, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SLEEPY RONALD by Jack Gantos
Released: Sept. 15, 1976

"But since the pictures have narrative punch to go with their visual zap, they just might carry this sleeper along."
Rubel's splashy, tutti-frutti backgrounds were a natural environment for Rotten Ralph (p. 129, J-39). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RONALD REAGAN by Jacob Weisberg
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"This concise biography makes a good case that Reagan was the second most important president of the 20th century after Franklin Roosevelt."
The latest in the commendable American Presidents series is a thoughtful biography of an increasingly well-regarded president. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 1, 2007

"A significant book, if surely arguable in granting Reagan more depth and ability than most nonbelievers have hitherto suspected."
A middle-of-the-road liberal (John Adams, 2003, etc.) looks into Ronald Reagan's soul and concludes that it was great—and that the president was "politically wise, humane, and magnanimous" to boot. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RONALD KNOX by Evelyn Waugh
Released: June 15, 1959

"He does more than record his subject's exterior life; he provides a record of a lost era — which World War I changed forever."
Although this biography was respectfully reviewed when it was first published in England — due, one suspects, as much to its author as to its subject — it was apparent that, for his countrymen, Ronald Knox, the man, remains essentially remote. Read full book review >