Search Results: "Rosalind Brackenbury"


BOOK REVIEW

BECOMING GEORGE SAND by Rosalind Brackenbury
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 17, 2011

"Slender and a little too neat, but a resonant meditation on love, literature and lived experience."
Parallel love stories link and illuminate the lives of two women, the 19th-century French writer George Sand and a Scottish academic writing about her. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"Engaging and fun to read, but for a more subtle study, see Myraim Miedzian's Boys Will Be Boys (p. 587)."
The lurid title suits this swift, wry, anecdotal survey of the pitiful confusion that Miles (The Women's History of the World, 1989; Women and Power, 1986) finds in the lives of adult men: Acculturated largely by women to identify with their penises (which makes them prone to violence), they are, she says, ``dislocated'' by the women's movement, frustrated, angry, and even more violent than historically they have been known to be. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GRANDMA’S BEACH by Rosalind Beardshaw
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2004

"A subtle and positively uplifting duo that will easily help any child through those inevitable crestfallen moments in life. (Picture book. 3-5)"
Sometimes creative and inventive grandparents can provide the best solutions for the disappointments a child may encounter. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SUGAR PAVILION by Rosalind Laker
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 1994

"Leisurely, long, stiff as a board in places, but with some yum-yum desserts."
From period-romancer Laker (The Venetian Mask, 1992; etc.), a tale of smuggling, the plight of ÇmigrÇ aristocrats during the French Revolution, the amours of the future George IV, and the art of the confectionery trade—all in the 1790's seaside resort of Brighton. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JANE CROW by Rosalind Rosenberg
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 3, 2017

"Assiduous research and clear prose give Murray her due."
A cradle-to-grave account about one of the most interesting, accomplished, and controversial figures in 20th-century America who is far too little known. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 2010

"But Charlie and her friends are outspoken and engaging, and the ending, while neither surprising nor original, will satisfy readers who like a tidy finish. (Fiction. 11-14)"
Wiseman has written widely on the social dynamics of teens, most notably in Queen Bees & Wannabes (2002). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Odyssey of an Etruscan Noblewoman by Rosalind Burgundy
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 3, 2005

"A historically based survival tale of lost heritage, homelessness and empowerment that ably incorporates regional traditions, customs and commerce."
An Etruscan noblewoman undergoes numerous trials and tribulations in another work of historical fiction from author Burgundy (Tuscan Intrigue, 2005, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BOOK REVIEW

BRUNO CASSINI by Rosalind Trotter
FICTION & LITERATURE

"A pleasant novel, but one that reaches for revelations it can't quite grasp."
In Trotter's debut novel, an Italian family man's love affair forces him to confront the shifting cultural landscape. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PICASSO'S WOMAN by Rosalind MacPhee
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 1996

"Any book from MacPhee promises equally to be a good one."
Published in Canada in slightly different form in 1994, this absorbing story of a resourceful and courageous woman learning to live with breast cancer received the Canadian Authors Association Literary Award. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DOMESTIC SECRETS by Rosalind Noonan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 3, 2015

"Noonan (Take Another Look, 2015, etc.) delivers another page-turning romantic thriller whose deeply flawed characters draw you into a web of family secrets."
They may be besties, but two suburban single mothers are most unlikely friends. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 20, 1997

"Occasionally self-indulgent and slow, Brackenbury's memoir is best read for the local color and some chilling, death-defying moments."
A mountain-climbing chiropractor becomes perhaps the first westerner ever to reach a remote Tibetan valley, in the hope of making contact with a little-known tribe called the Drung. Read full book review >