Search Results: "Rosalind Miles"


BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 2004

"As always from Desai: an intelligent and freshly tooled retelling of an old story."
True love contends with treachery in high places in this last of a trilogy (Isolde, 2002, etc.) about the fraught lives of Tristan, noble knight, and Isolde, Queen of Ireland. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I, ELIZABETH by Rosalind Miles
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

"Not great, but not trash either: romantic pseudo-history, weighty in size, scope, and ambition—if not achievement. (Literary Guild selection; author tour)"
From British novelist and nonfiction author Miles (The Women's History of the World, 1989, etc.), an impressively researched fictional portrait of England's great queen (15331603) as emotionally high-strung, thirsty for love, and a martyr to her role. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"Engaging and fun to read, but for a more subtle study, see Myraim Miedzian's Boys Will Be Boys (p. 587)."
The lurid title suits this swift, wry, anecdotal survey of the pitiful confusion that Miles (The Women's History of the World, 1989; Women and Power, 1986) finds in the lives of adult men: Acculturated largely by women to identify with their penises (which makes them prone to violence), they are, she says, ``dislocated'' by the women's movement, frustrated, angry, and even more violent than historically they have been known to be. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE KNIGHT OF THE SACRED LAKE by Rosalind Miles
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2000

"The best kind of historical fiction, with characters that ignore the heavy hand of history and instead live their own full and complex lives. A terrific read."
A literate, wonderfully written, alluring tale, the second in a trilogy (after Guenevere: Queen of the Summer Country), offers a subtle feminist interpretation of the Arthurian legends as it continues the story of Guenevere, forced to choose between love and duty for the sake of her kingdom. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CHILD OF THE HOLY GRAIL by Rosalind Miles
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2001

"Intellectually satisfying historical fiction that's also immensely entertaining."
In this final installment in the Guenevere trilogy (Knight of the Sacred Lake, 2000, etc.), Miles gives a provocative twist to the search for the Holy Grail—in a beautifully rendered and elegiac tale of betrayal, the passing of the old order, and the constancy of true love. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ISOLDE by Rosalind Miles
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2002

"Fans can take their seats for another exhilarating ride through Arthurian Britain."
Miles, author of a Guenevere trilogy (The Child of the Holy Grail, 2001, etc.), again gives a persuasive feminist tweak to an old tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 2008

"A useful introduction to the history of chiefs of distaff and other women at arms."
A comprehensive tour of battlefields ancient and modern in which women have fought alongside men. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GRANDMA’S BEACH by Rosalind Beardshaw
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2004

"A subtle and positively uplifting duo that will easily help any child through those inevitable crestfallen moments in life. (Picture book. 3-5)"
Sometimes creative and inventive grandparents can provide the best solutions for the disappointments a child may encounter. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FROG PRINCESS by Rosalind Allchin
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"Readers will jump for this tongue-in-cheek variation on the theme of being careful what you wish for. (Picture book. 6-8)"
A dreamy frog discovers that the life of a Royal isn't all crunchy flies and cool waters in this sardonic debut. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JANE CROW by Rosalind Rosenberg
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 3, 2017

"Assiduous research and clear prose give Murray her due."
A cradle-to-grave account about one of the most interesting, accomplished, and controversial figures in 20th-century America who is far too little known. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SUGAR PAVILION by Rosalind Laker
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 1994

"Leisurely, long, stiff as a board in places, but with some yum-yum desserts."
From period-romancer Laker (The Venetian Mask, 1992; etc.), a tale of smuggling, the plight of ÇmigrÇ aristocrats during the French Revolution, the amours of the future George IV, and the art of the confectionery trade—all in the 1790's seaside resort of Brighton. Read full book review >