Search Results: "Rosemary Sutcliff"


BOOK REVIEW

ROSEMARY by Kate Clifford Larson
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 6, 2015

"A well-researched, entertaining, and illuminating biography that should take pride of place over another recent Rosemary bio, Elizabeth Koehler-Pentacoff's The Missing Kennedy."
In-depth coverage of one Kennedy daughter who never gained the spotlight like her siblings. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SWORD SONG by Rosemary Sutcliff
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"A glorious tale, full of pulse and power. (Fiction. 10-14)"
An action book if there ever was one, found in full draft among the prolific Sutcliff's papers at the time of her death in 1992, and a fine last gift. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SUN HORSE MOON HORSE by Rosemary Sutcliff
Released: March 20, 1978

"Though Sutcliff has given us more rounded recreations in the past, and here as elsewhere her plot sometimes seems too well made, her vision of an artist simultaneously—in fact, indissolubly—true to his art and to his people is impressively realized."
In an effort to imagine the origin of the ancient White Horse of Uffington, cut into a hillside with what she feels to be a magical power, Sutcliff invents Lubrin Dhu, a chief's third son, who is somehow possessed of the true artistic impulse, a need to get into his impermanent drawings the feel and the flight of the birds—or of the horses which are at the center of his people's economy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HEROES AND HISTORY by Rosemary Sutcliff
Released: Jan. 15, 1966

"Hero-light on his forehead.'"
England's heroes, through a language and literature shared, become ours even if many of them are too often reduced to foothold status in footnote descriptions. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SHINING COMPANY by Rosemary Sutcliff
Released: June 22, 1990

"A splendid achievement."
Around A.D. 600, King Mynyddog gathered 300 warriors for a year's training in what is now Edinburgh, then sent them to fight the Anglo-Saxon settlers to the south. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FLAME-COLORED TAFFETA by Rosemary Sutcliff
Released: Nov. 19, 1986

"Both lively adventure and love story, it should find a wider audience than books she has set in the more distant past."
The preeminent master of British historical fiction for young people turns her hand to the 18th century, a story of smugglers on the Sussex coast and an emissary of Bonnie Prince Charlie. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 24, 1982

"As before, Sutcliff tells them straight, with apparently unswerving and heartfelt conviction."
Once more, as in The Light Beyond the Forest (1980) whose events follow these, Sutcliff immerses herself and her readers in the sensibility of the medieval legend. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BLOOD FEUD by Rosemary Sutcliff
Released: June 10, 1977

"What impresses once more is the way Sutcliff integrates individual contingencies and choices with the larger currents and Clashes, and contains it all in each sharply differentiated, immediately visualized scene."
Remarkably wide-ranging yet tightly cast, Sutcliff's cross-cultural chronicle takes her orphaned hero Justyn Englishman from a Celtic outpost to Saxon Britain, on to Viking slavery in Dublin, and then, freed, home to Norseland with his former master Thormod—and with him across the Baltic and down river to Constantinople, drafted en route to fight for Byzantine Basil II. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WITCH'S BRAT by Rosemary Sutcliff
Released: Oct. 1, 1970

"Brimful — and how good to have a Sutcliff with wide, young appeal."
Sutcliff's prodigious historical tapestry spell-bound with empathy for Lovel, the hunchback whose healing hands secure him a place in the world, and sympathy for crippled stonemason Nick Redpoll, whose healing is Lovel's fulfillment, his giving of himself, not just his skill, to another. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HOUND OF ULSTER by Rosemary Sutcliff
Released: Feb. 29, 1964

"More for the librarian's background than for the children themselves."
One of England's finest authors turns her hand to a re-telling of the Cuchulain Saga with less success than in any previous work. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BONNIE DUNDEE by Rosemary Sutcliff
Released: June 11, 1984

"So, with additional texture from Darklis' part-gypsy heritage and the authentic details on period-painting, this is rich, tough-minded, warm-hearted historical fiction on the very highest level: an invigorating blend of action, color, and romance."
"Bonnie Dundee" was John Graham of Claverhouse (1648-1689), the Scottish soldier who led the first Jacobite uprising, known to his enemies (the fanatic Protestant "Covenanters") as "Bloody Claver'se." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FRONTIER WOLF by Rosemary Sutcliff
Released: April 14, 1981

"As always, Sutcliff brings the frontier society of 'wolves' and tribesmen to powerful, three-dimensional life and makes their trials and decisions matter urgently."
Centurion Alexios Flavius Aquila, nephew of the Dux Britanniarum (Roman Governor of Northern Britain) and therefore, at 23, second in command of a fort, becomes first when the commander is killed in a raid by native tribes. Read full book review >