Search Results: "Rosemary Sutcliff"


BOOK REVIEW

THE SHINING COMPANY by Rosemary Sutcliff
Released: June 22, 1990

"A splendid achievement."
Around A.D. 600, King Mynyddog gathered 300 warriors for a year's training in what is now Edinburgh, then sent them to fight the Anglo-Saxon settlers to the south. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BLOOD FEUD by Rosemary Sutcliff
Released: June 10, 1977

"What impresses once more is the way Sutcliff integrates individual contingencies and choices with the larger currents and Clashes, and contains it all in each sharply differentiated, immediately visualized scene."
Remarkably wide-ranging yet tightly cast, Sutcliff's cross-cultural chronicle takes her orphaned hero Justyn Englishman from a Celtic outpost to Saxon Britain, on to Viking slavery in Dublin, and then, freed, home to Norseland with his former master Thormod—and with him across the Baltic and down river to Constantinople, drafted en route to fight for Byzantine Basil II. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SONG FOR A DARK QUEEN by Rosemary Sutcliff
Released: March 1, 1979

"A stirring, quietly eloquent miniature for young people just dipping their toes in these dark and turbulent waters."
If Boudicca's tribe was a matriarchy and she was Queen in her own right, then her vengeance on the Romans for assaulting her person and raping her daughters takes on a different aspect, at once grander and more human. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE EAGLE OF THE NINTH by Rosemary Sutcliff
Released: June 15, 1954

"Maturely conceived, grounded in scholarship."
A fresh background this, and one that is its own reward in an unusual story of Britain under Roman suzerainty. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FLOWERS OF ADONIS by Rosemary Sutcliff
Released: Feb. 12, 1969

"Highly satisfactory."
Miss Sutcliff has produced Sword at Sunset as well as a number of fine, careful juveniles and this historical novel, based on the career of Alcibiades (here spelled with a "k"), a fifth century B.C. statesman and general, again evidences the same breadth of scholarship, efficiency of style plus a certain mature urgency. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A LITTLE DOG LIKE YOU by Rosemary Sutcliff
Released: Aug. 1, 1990

"A well-wrought charmer."
After Pippin, a beloved Chihuahua, dies, he begs St. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ARMOURER'S HOUSE by Rosemary Sutcliff
Released: June 15, 1952

"The pictures by C. Walter Hodges of narrow streets, tall angular houses, the dockyards, snow covered roofs at Christmas, are well designed and detailed, endowed with a warmth that complements the stories."
A gay portrait of London in the days of Henry VIII and Ann Boleyn as it was seen by young Tamsyn Caunter of Devon who came to live with her swordsmith uncle and his family. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KNIGHT'S FEE by Rosemary Sutcliff
Released: Sept. 21, 1960

"Set against a period of history which was both vital and exciting, Knight's Fee, by the author of The Lantern Bearers, provides the reader not only with a moving story but with a picture of the beginnings of what now is modern England and France."
Randal, the dog-boy, through the whim of a jester becomes companion to a young English noble. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DAWN WIND by Rosemary Sutcliff
Released: Feb. 21, 1962

"An era few history courses tackle is enlivened and portrayed for the admirer of historical adventure."
True to form, Rosemary Sutcliff has dramatized another aspect of British history with the same skill and accuracy that characterized her earlier books. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SWORD SONG by Rosemary Sutcliff
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"A glorious tale, full of pulse and power. (Fiction. 10-14)"
An action book if there ever was one, found in full draft among the prolific Sutcliff's papers at the time of her death in 1992, and a fine last gift. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SUN HORSE MOON HORSE by Rosemary Sutcliff
Released: March 20, 1978

"Though Sutcliff has given us more rounded recreations in the past, and here as elsewhere her plot sometimes seems too well made, her vision of an artist simultaneously—in fact, indissolubly—true to his art and to his people is impressively realized."
In an effort to imagine the origin of the ancient White Horse of Uffington, cut into a hillside with what she feels to be a magical power, Sutcliff invents Lubrin Dhu, a chief's third son, who is somehow possessed of the true artistic impulse, a need to get into his impermanent drawings the feel and the flight of the birds—or of the horses which are at the center of his people's economy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HEROES AND HISTORY by Rosemary Sutcliff
Released: Jan. 15, 1966

"Hero-light on his forehead.'"
England's heroes, through a language and literature shared, become ours even if many of them are too often reduced to foothold status in footnote descriptions. Read full book review >