Search Results: "Rosemary Sutcliff"


BOOK REVIEW

HEROES AND HISTORY by Rosemary Sutcliff
Released: Jan. 15, 1966

"Hero-light on his forehead.'"
England's heroes, through a language and literature shared, become ours even if many of them are too often reduced to foothold status in footnote descriptions. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 24, 1982

"As before, Sutcliff tells them straight, with apparently unswerving and heartfelt conviction."
Once more, as in The Light Beyond the Forest (1980) whose events follow these, Sutcliff immerses herself and her readers in the sensibility of the medieval legend. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SHINING COMPANY by Rosemary Sutcliff
Released: June 22, 1990

"A splendid achievement."
Around A.D. 600, King Mynyddog gathered 300 warriors for a year's training in what is now Edinburgh, then sent them to fight the Anglo-Saxon settlers to the south. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WITCH'S BRAT by Rosemary Sutcliff
Released: Oct. 1, 1970

"Brimful — and how good to have a Sutcliff with wide, young appeal."
Sutcliff's prodigious historical tapestry spell-bound with empathy for Lovel, the hunchback whose healing hands secure him a place in the world, and sympathy for crippled stonemason Nick Redpoll, whose healing is Lovel's fulfillment, his giving of himself, not just his skill, to another. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TRISTAN AND ISEULT by Rosemary Sutcliff
Released: Oct. 1, 1971

"With all the vagaries of the romance and the conventions of the code it has a strong appeal, but it's not the real thing."
In presenting stories from the past, Rosemary Sutcliff has an unusual capacity for retaining the flavor of the original while discarding antiquated syntax and inconsequential detail. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DAWN WIND by Rosemary Sutcliff
Released: Feb. 21, 1962

"An era few history courses tackle is enlivened and portrayed for the admirer of historical adventure."
True to form, Rosemary Sutcliff has dramatized another aspect of British history with the same skill and accuracy that characterized her earlier books. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A LITTLE DOG LIKE YOU by Rosemary Sutcliff
Released: Aug. 1, 1990

"A well-wrought charmer."
After Pippin, a beloved Chihuahua, dies, he begs St. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FLOWERS OF ADONIS by Rosemary Sutcliff
Released: Feb. 12, 1969

"Highly satisfactory."
Miss Sutcliff has produced Sword at Sunset as well as a number of fine, careful juveniles and this historical novel, based on the career of Alcibiades (here spelled with a "k"), a fifth century B.C. statesman and general, again evidences the same breadth of scholarship, efficiency of style plus a certain mature urgency. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Aug. 3, 1950

"Not for the action-minded child for the more serious reader, rather."
For those who are still fairy-and once-upon-a-time-minded, this story of young Perdita who lived in Elizabe than England and whose wish, when the Pharisees (fairies) gave her one on her birthday, was to see and touch the Queen. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BLUE REMEMBERED HILLS by Rosemary Sutcliff
Released: May 21, 1984

"Sutcliff fans and connoisseurs of childhood-memoirs."
With the same no-nonsense vigor that is the hallmark of her historical novels for children, Sutcliff recalls her first 25 years—making only the most matter-of-fact references to her permanent crippling by Still's Disease, a rare form of juvenile arthritis. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LADY IN WAITING by Rosemary Sutcliff
Released: April 4, 1957

"A first adult novel by one who has hitherto written for children follows history as competently as it does its characters."
..... was Sir Walter Raleigh's wife, Bess Throckmorton, who shared her husband with his "bright, devouring dream" and whose waiting, lonesomeness, and love was a shield against his many desperate hours. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BONNIE DUNDEE by Rosemary Sutcliff
Released: June 11, 1984

"So, with additional texture from Darklis' part-gypsy heritage and the authentic details on period-painting, this is rich, tough-minded, warm-hearted historical fiction on the very highest level: an invigorating blend of action, color, and romance."
"Bonnie Dundee" was John Graham of Claverhouse (1648-1689), the Scottish soldier who led the first Jacobite uprising, known to his enemies (the fanatic Protestant "Covenanters") as "Bloody Claver'se." Read full book review >