Search Results: "Rosemary Sutcliff"


BOOK REVIEW

THE SHINING COMPANY by Rosemary Sutcliff
Released: June 22, 1990

"A splendid achievement."
Around A.D. 600, King Mynyddog gathered 300 warriors for a year's training in what is now Edinburgh, then sent them to fight the Anglo-Saxon settlers to the south. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LADY IN WAITING by Rosemary Sutcliff
Released: April 4, 1957

"A first adult novel by one who has hitherto written for children follows history as competently as it does its characters."
..... was Sir Walter Raleigh's wife, Bess Throckmorton, who shared her husband with his "bright, devouring dream" and whose waiting, lonesomeness, and love was a shield against his many desperate hours. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: April 17, 1980

"Librarians should also remember, though, that equally readable but stronger versions exist in such staples as Keith Baines' rendition of Malory's Le Morte D'Arthur."
A straight, almost solemn retelling of the quest for the Grail: from the coming of Galahad and the knights' rushing off—"knowing well enough where the Grail was lodged," but knowing too that "they must cast themselves on fate, welcoming whichever way it took them"—to Galahad's successfully "coming into the heart of the mystery, where it is not possible for a mortal man to come, and yet remain mortal." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KNIGHT'S FEE by Rosemary Sutcliff
Released: Sept. 21, 1960

"Set against a period of history which was both vital and exciting, Knight's Fee, by the author of The Lantern Bearers, provides the reader not only with a moving story but with a picture of the beginnings of what now is modern England and France."
Randal, the dog-boy, through the whim of a jester becomes companion to a young English noble. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Aug. 3, 1950

"Not for the action-minded child for the more serious reader, rather."
For those who are still fairy-and once-upon-a-time-minded, this story of young Perdita who lived in Elizabe than England and whose wish, when the Pharisees (fairies) gave her one on her birthday, was to see and touch the Queen. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RIDER ON A WHITE HORSE by Rosemary Sutcliff
Released: Oct. 16, 1959

"For the serious reader of English historical fiction, this should be most satisfying and rewarding."
Sir Thomas Fairfax is the rider and White Surrey is the horse and this is the story of their three years of war on the Parliamentarian side against the Royalists in the West Riding country. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ARMOURER'S HOUSE by Rosemary Sutcliff
Released: June 15, 1952

"The pictures by C. Walter Hodges of narrow streets, tall angular houses, the dockyards, snow covered roofs at Christmas, are well designed and detailed, endowed with a warmth that complements the stories."
A gay portrait of London in the days of Henry VIII and Ann Boleyn as it was seen by young Tamsyn Caunter of Devon who came to live with her swordsmith uncle and his family. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 18, 1972

"Each offers a sharp if fleeting glimpse of a different culture, but it is the reality of the settings and not the unremarkable plots that must sustain Ms. Sutcliff's considerable reputation."
Three of Rosemary Sutcliff's carefully crafted recreations of ancient times, generally less compelling than her full-length works though they exemplify the same seemingly effortless blend of story and setting. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SIMON by Richard Kennedy
Released: Feb. 25, 1954

"Historical romance on an old theme, broad enough to give it new life."
England during Cromwell's revolution, and especially that part of Devon which saw the heat of it, backgrounds an adventure of loyalties and plots, highlights a character and vividly paints the issues with which he has to deal. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SWORD SONG by Rosemary Sutcliff
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"A glorious tale, full of pulse and power. (Fiction. 10-14)"
An action book if there ever was one, found in full draft among the prolific Sutcliff's papers at the time of her death in 1992, and a fine last gift. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SUN HORSE MOON HORSE by Rosemary Sutcliff
Released: March 20, 1978

"Though Sutcliff has given us more rounded recreations in the past, and here as elsewhere her plot sometimes seems too well made, her vision of an artist simultaneously—in fact, indissolubly—true to his art and to his people is impressively realized."
In an effort to imagine the origin of the ancient White Horse of Uffington, cut into a hillside with what she feels to be a magical power, Sutcliff invents Lubrin Dhu, a chief's third son, who is somehow possessed of the true artistic impulse, a need to get into his impermanent drawings the feel and the flight of the birds—or of the horses which are at the center of his people's economy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HEROES AND HISTORY by Rosemary Sutcliff
Released: Jan. 15, 1966

"Hero-light on his forehead.'"
England's heroes, through a language and literature shared, become ours even if many of them are too often reduced to foothold status in footnote descriptions. Read full book review >