Search Results: "Roy Heath"


BOOK REVIEW

THE ARMSTRONG TRILOGY by Roy Heath
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 14, 1994

"The result is harrowing in its simplicity and cumulative force."
A spare, bleak saga of two generations in the life of a Guyanese family struggling for respectability but unable to snatch any but the most fleeting moments of happiness. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MURDERER by Roy Heath
Released: March 10, 1992

"A large cast, encompassing both Georgetown's precarious bourgeoisie and its slum-dwellers, supplies a jabber of different voices and occasional vitality to Heath's essentially lifeless story—lifeless because Galton never makes the leap from case- history to flesh-and-blood individual."
Guyana, that Caribbean-oriented, erstwhile British colony in South America, is the setting for this short psychological study of repression: published in England to some acclaim in 1978, but the first US publication for this Guyanese-born, London-based author. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MINISTRY OF HOPE by Roy Heath
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"On all counts, a triumph."
A wonderful comic novel about an irrepressible hustler and the culture that spawns and sustains him, set in Guyana, by the Guyanese-born author whose prizewinning fiction includes The Armstrong Trilogy (1994) and The Shadow Bride (1995). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FROM THE HEART OF THE DAY by Roy Heath
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 12, 1993

"One wonders how much hope the sequels can offer the younger Armstrongs."
The opening installment, first published in England in 1979, of a generational trilogy about the luckless Armstrong family of Georgetown by Guyanese writer Heath. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SHADOW BRIDE by Roy Heath
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 28, 1995

"It's hard to believe it didn't win."
The Guyanese-born Heath (the superb Armstrong Trilogy, 1994, etc.) surpasses himself with this ambitious, vividly written, psychologically rich chronicle—set in his own colorfully multiracial native country—of compromised ambition and family conflict. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KWAKU by Roy Heath
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1997

"There's no longer any doubt that Heath is one of the world's best writers."
A first American edition of the 1982 novel (winner of England's Guardian Prize) that introduced the appealing antihero of Heath's recent The Ministry of Hope (1997). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I WANNA BE A GREAT BIG DINOSAUR by Heath McKenzie
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 17, 2016

"Something like a gender-switched companion to the author's My Rules for Being a Pretty Princess (2015), but with more give and take between the roles. (Picture book. 6-8)"
A little boy finds out what dinosaurs do…and vice versa. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

ARUNDHATI ROY
by Gregory McNamee

Epic in scope, Arundhati Roy’s new novel, The Ministry of Utmost Happiness  opens with an arresting vignette, one in which the skies over Delhi, India, are suddenly absent of vultures, long the city’s characteristic birds. The vultures are gone owing to a poison called diclofenac, given to dairy cows as a muscle relaxant to “ease pain and increase the ...


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BOOK REVIEW

THE BLUE DEEP by Layne Heath
Released: March 18, 1993

"Grim—but what else?"
Helicopter pilots leave the Korean War to go after black- marketeers in Hanoi during the final days of the French rule in Indochina. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MONEY RUN by Jack Heath
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2013

"Take a deep breath, go with it, and never look back. (Adventure. 10-16)"
Ashley and Benjamin are two teen partners in crime—real crime, as in major heists—who rely on their youth to avoid suspicion. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CHILDREN BOB MOSES LED by William Heath
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"An absorbing look at one of America's darkest and most courageous moments."
In a hazy mixture of fact and fiction, the Freedom Summer Project of 1964 comes alive in the contrasting narratives of civil rights leader Bob Moses and fictional volunteer Tom Morton. Read full book review >