Search Results: "Roy Peter Clark"


BOOK REVIEW

ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Jan. 26, 2016

"With lively, colorful writing and inspired practical advice, this guide earns a spot along with Clark's Writing Tools (2006) as essential reading for writers. Recommended for book lovers as well."
Just when you think Poynter Institute senior scholar Clark, who has written some of the best books on the writer's craft, has covered everything related to the subject, he digs deep into literature and excavates a gold mine of artistic strategies for great writing. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOW TO WRITE SHORT by Roy Peter Clark
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Aug. 27, 2013

"Writers can surely benefit from practicing some of these tiny techniques, but voracious reading, writing, traveling, thinking and feeling can help even more."
A veteran writing teacher at the Poynter Institute returns with some ideas that writers can learn from the short forms that now proliferate—from tweets to text messages to bathroom scrawls (really). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MY LIFE--IN SPITE OF MYSELF! by Roy Clark
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 10, 1994

"A reader is left feeling that one of the good guys has found success, but with little insight into what, beyond talent and hard work, might have raised him to the top. (B&w photos—32 pages—not seen)"
Roy Clark, the genial multi-instrumentalist and longtime host of TV's Hee Haw, tells the story of his rags-to-riches climb to stardom. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 17, 2013

"A clearly written, extensively researched book and an important contribution to World War II history."
A thorough history of East Prussia during and after World War II. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

PETER WATSON
by Gregory McNamee

Five hundred-odd years ago, in the time of Leonardo da Vinci, a scientist—a term then unknown—was a person of many parts, someone who might work in fields ranging from chemistry to botany, astronomy to metallurgy, to divine the hidden order of the universe.

Even as recently as the early Victorian idea, writes British science historian Peter Watson in his new ...


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BLOG POST

ARUNDHATI ROY
by Gregory McNamee

Epic in scope, Arundhati Roy’s new novel, The Ministry of Utmost Happiness  opens with an arresting vignette, one in which the skies over Delhi, India, are suddenly absent of vultures, long the city’s characteristic birds. The vultures are gone owing to a poison called diclofenac, given to dairy cows as a muscle relaxant to “ease pain and increase the ...


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BOOK REVIEW

TIME AND THE CLOCK MICE, ETCETERA by Peter Dickinson
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 1994

"Unique, charming, and thoughtful, too—this could become a classic. (Fiction. 8+)"
Dickinson brings to this lighthearted, intricately crafted book several of his themes in such books for older readers as A Bone from a Dry Sea (1993): the relative meaning of time, the hazards of equating ability with virtue, and the joy of innovation. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

INTO THE WILD WITH KATHERINE ROY
by Julie Danielson

Katherine Roy up and won a 2015 Robert F. Sibert Award Honor Book for her meticulously-researched Neighborhood Sharks (also named a Kirkus Best Children’s Book of 2014), which explored, just a few miles from San Francisco, the ocean’s largest predators. Not bad for the first book she both wrote and illustrated.

Now she’s back with How to Be an ...


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BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 30, 2014

"Full of the eww factor, up-to-date facts and kid appeal, this splendid, gory introduction is not for the faint of heart! (Informational picture book. 7-10)"
Every fall, great white sharks return to feed on the seals and sea lions that migrate to the Farallon Islands just off the San Francisco coast, providing an opportunity for scientific study. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ROMAN TWINS by Roy Gerrard
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"Told in rhyming verse, the genial book is inhabited by Gerrard's characteristically dwarfish people, living among extraordinarily detailed buildings. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Gerrard (Wagons West!, 1996, etc.) takes on Goths and the Roman Empire with a uniquely upended story of twins. Read full book review >