Search Results: "Russell Hoban"


BOOK REVIEW

ARTHUR'S NEW POWER by Russell Hoban
Released: Sept. 6, 1978

"Though without the wicked twist that made Dinner at Alberta's a treat, it's a good sneaky generational joke, pulled off with cool."
It's always disconcerting when a character created by one illustrator returns in the style of another, but Barton's offhand absurdity well suits this not-too-serious fable of electronic over-consumption. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TWENTY ELEPHANT RESTAURANT by Russell Hoban
Released: March 10, 1978

"McCully, alas, never seems to catch on; but that won't matter when you read the story aloud—if you can, without breaking up."
This seductive exercise in runaway absurdity starts out with a wobbly table that is wearing the man out: when he bought it 50 years ago he was young and handsome, and now he's old and ugly. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Aug. 20, 1973

"One of those special, hopefully not too special, books which pads softly through the dark underbrush of much that we feel and hope and sense and magnifies experience on several levels, simultaneously."
"A map is the dead body of where you've been. A map is the unborn baby of where you're going" — and a lion, well a map might lead to a lion in some distant, primal part of the world for even if lions are extinct they are very much alive in the imaginations of Boaz-Jachin and his father Jachin-Boaz, a mapmaker who has lost his bearings somewhere in the middle of middle age. Mr. Hoban who has been charming a younger audience for many years has now written a teasing, perhaps even disturbing, fantasia about father and son, any father and son, and maps and lions — particularly lions as emblematic of the chimera, the challenge, the absolute. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DANCING TIGERS by Russell Hoban
Released: Feb. 15, 1981

"The full-color pictures are naturalistic, quite accomplished, very dramatic; the story is arch-to-arcane, adult, and not especially impressive at that."
An out-of-the-way allegory—very out of the way—about a Rajah who goes out hunting tigers with "a telephone and a bar and a new stereo tape cassette player" in his howdah; the "very primitive" tigers who have a repertoire of intricate, meaningful dances; the Rajah's advent, now, playing "light classics"; and the elder tiger's decision that "this is. . . simply too much" ("My whole world picture has suddenly changed")—the tigers will "dance [the Rajah] to death"! Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

UGLY BIRD by Russell Hoban
Released: Aug. 18, 1969

Any youngster who's ever nurtured a secret invulnerable self will take wing with Ugly Bird. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HER NAME WAS LOLA by Russell Hoban
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2004

"Sophisticated pleasures and a grown-up love story from the estimable Hoban."
A quick, droll, pleasantly amusing love story set in London around about now. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EGG THOUGHTS, AND OTHER FRANCES SONGS by Lillian Hoban
Released: April 1, 1972

"Frances' songs will make new friends for the little badger, and keep some old ones who are outgrowing the picture books."
Besides the favorite "Soft-Boiled" from Bread and Jam for Frances (1964), 21 new poems with the same fresh but familiar appeal of the Frances stories. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MOUSE AND HIS CHILD by David Small
Released: Oct. 1, 1967

"A rich disturbing, very touching book."
"Be naked" our departing predecessor pinned to the bulletin board, and we have never felt so vuluerable as in anticipating the response to Russell Hoban's arresting departure from juvenile precedent. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JIM'S LION by Russell Hoban
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 11, 2014

"Of possible interest to caregivers seeking books with bibliotherapeutic potential, this difficult and inventive work is most likely to be appreciated for its artistic vision. (Graphic/fiction hybrid. 7-10)"
Illustrator Deacon offers a dramatic, disturbing interpretation of an already-unsettling story of childhood illness. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SOONCHILD by Russell Hoban
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 14, 2012

"A lyrically beautiful existential fable, unfortunately based on paternalistic and romanticized notions about Native peoples. (author's note) (Fantasy. 10 & up)"
Beloved for such classics as Bedtime for Frances and The Mouse and His Child, the late master leaves a mystical tale about life, death and expiation of mistakes wrapped up as a romanticized Inuit fable. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MARZIPAN PIG by Russell Hoban
Released: May 20, 1987

"A good choice for young readers who enjoy fantasy."
Long ago, Hoban wrote several quintessentially sensible picture books about Frances, a badger. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROSIE'S MAGIC HORSE by Russell Hoban
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 12, 2013

"It's an exuberant reminder to dream big, although, sadly, Hoban's text has been Americanized, losing some of its flavor. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A little girl finds a discarded ice-pop stick, triggering a surprising adventure in this rib-tickling fantasy. Read full book review >