Search Results: "Russell Hoban"


BOOK REVIEW

THE DANCING TIGERS by Russell Hoban
Released: Feb. 15, 1981

"The full-color pictures are naturalistic, quite accomplished, very dramatic; the story is arch-to-arcane, adult, and not especially impressive at that."
An out-of-the-way allegory—very out of the way—about a Rajah who goes out hunting tigers with "a telephone and a bar and a new stereo tape cassette player" in his howdah; the "very primitive" tigers who have a repertoire of intricate, meaningful dances; the Rajah's advent, now, playing "light classics"; and the elder tiger's decision that "this is. . . simply too much" ("My whole world picture has suddenly changed")—the tigers will "dance [the Rajah] to death"! Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HARVEY'S HIDEOUT by Russell Hoban
Released: April 15, 1969

"Lots of them will find Harvey's Hideout."
Harvey Muskrat and feuding sister Mildred have more than a furface resemblance to Frances badgered by little sister Gloria. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SAVE MY PLACE by Russell Hoban
Released: June 26, 1967

"Closing on Saturday night."
One by one the animals—Rabbit, Mouse, Possum, Chipmunk, etc.—reserve a seat at the edge of the pond for the evening performance—firefly fireworks and a concert featuring "all the frogs and toads in the pond and all the crickets and katydids and peepers on the shore." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TOM AND THE TWO HANDLES by Russell Hoban
Released: April 7, 1965

"Tom's choice is to make up or get even and Tom manages to try out both handles before this short and satisfying story is through."
"Look," said Tom. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SEA-THING CHILD by Russell Hoban
Released: Oct. 25, 1972

"This tiny book (with fewer than 27 5' by 7' pages of text and a few small black and white sketches that merely echo the mood and suggest the setting) is probably what the word exquisite should have been saved for, and only Hoban could bring it off."
"The wind was howling, the sea was wild, and the night was black when the storm flung the sea-thing child up on the beach." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THEY CAME FROM AARGH! by Russell Hoban
Released: Oct. 16, 1982

They came from Aargh! Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 1, 1971

"Wherever your home, it's a real down-home Christmas story."
With characteristically uncloying gentleness and a conscious use of familiar devices that is neither burlesque nor banality, the Hobans depict an affectionate otter family (just Emmet and his widowed mother) in a softly glowing old-fashioned setting. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LITTLE BRUTE FAMILY by Lillian Hoban
Released: Sept. 1, 1966

"Very nice."
There hasn't been anything in ages that concentrates on etiquette and inter-family courtesy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JIM'S LION by Russell Hoban
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 11, 2014

"Of possible interest to caregivers seeking books with bibliotherapeutic potential, this difficult and inventive work is most likely to be appreciated for its artistic vision. (Graphic/fiction hybrid. 7-10)"
Illustrator Deacon offers a dramatic, disturbing interpretation of an already-unsettling story of childhood illness. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SOONCHILD by Russell Hoban
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 14, 2012

"A lyrically beautiful existential fable, unfortunately based on paternalistic and romanticized notions about Native peoples. (author's note) (Fantasy. 10 & up)"
Beloved for such classics as Bedtime for Frances and The Mouse and His Child, the late master leaves a mystical tale about life, death and expiation of mistakes wrapped up as a romanticized Inuit fable. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROSIE'S MAGIC HORSE by Russell Hoban
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 12, 2013

"It's an exuberant reminder to dream big, although, sadly, Hoban's text has been Americanized, losing some of its flavor. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A little girl finds a discarded ice-pop stick, triggering a surprising adventure in this rib-tickling fantasy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 17, 1974

"And so in the end Captain Najork gets Aunt Fidget Wonkham-Strong and Tom gets the captain's boat and a new aunt, Bundlejoy Cosysweet, and everyone's happy — including, inevitably, the reader (or better still listener), who might not realize the wisdom but is sure to enjoy the games, their outcome, and Hoban's cadenced, light-as-air sportscasting."
Tom liked to fool around. . . . Read full book review >