Search Results: "Ruth Krauss"


BOOK REVIEW

I WANT TO PAINT MY BATHROOM BLUE by Ruth Krauss
FICTION
Released: Aug. 22, 1956

"The pictures are in many shades of pastel."
With help again from Maurice Sendak, here is another book of the things one dreams about rather than does- like painting the bathroom blue and sprinkling seeds all over the sunny earth and having a whole house for all one's friends. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CANTILEVER RAINBOW by Ruth Krauss
Released: Sept. 30, 1965

"It should also find its way to what seems to us the most logical appreciative readership—college students with a taste and curiosity for the avant garde."
It was off-beat off Broadway first and it comes as a surprise to find these poem-plays and happenings being listed by the publishers at the 11 to 13 age level. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Dec. 2, 1968

"Really a cartoon strip despite its packaging, and in essence just as ephemeral."
. . . and Other Stories You Can Make Up Yourself if you want to be what you're not—and you're not easily discouraged. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I WRITE IT by Ruth Krauss
Released: April 1, 1970

"Felicity or Isaac or Pedro or Sean (from the multilingual signatures on the last page)."
Everywhere I write it: "On a piece of paper. . . Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOW TO MAKE AN EARTHQUAKE by Ruth Krauss
Released: May 1, 1954

"By the author of A Hole Is To Dig here is a grab bag of instructions for such tricks of the age as having sales, playing with parents and 'how to be inside a whale'- some naughty, some nice, some sugar, some spice."
Wanna know how? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: March 21, 1962

"A disappointment from the usually dependable Ruth Krauss."
It is hard to find conviction in the concept here. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BOUQUET OF LITTLES by Ruth Krauss
Released: Oct. 23, 1963

"A little book by a big author which is more than a little precious."
The author of A Hole Is to Dig (1952, p. 401) and Open House for Butterflies (1960, p. 288, J-142), here unaccompanied by Sendak, has turned from the wry, humorous approach to the world of little people to a quainter, more old-fashioned view. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A GOOD MAN AND HIS GOOD WIFE by Ruth Krauss
Released: Sept. 12, 1962

"Marc Simont's one color funny pictures bring out the heartiest humor in Ruth Krauss' new book."
How the good man cured his good wife of a bad habit will surprise and delight most audiences. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BACKWARD DAY by Ruth Krauss
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 6, 1950

"The idea will amuse when the tedium of too much routine is overpowering, and also show that a joke is a joke and not to be kept up indefinitely."
The appeal of this little book is its nonsense for the little boy who wakes to decide that "Today is backward day" carries through his dressing backwards, walks backwards, sits backwards at the breakfast table — and is joined by his father and mother and little sister. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HAPPY DAY by Ruth Krauss
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 7, 1949

"Possibly a book that has more perfection to an adult than to a child, but somehow I think children will grow into it, too."
A lovely book, which scarcely needs the captions, for the idea is evident in the enchanting pictures in soft blacks and whites, with one touch of color at the end. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A VERY SPECIAL HOUSE by Ruth Krauss
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1953

"Better, and closer to young imaginations than last year's A Hole Is To Dig."
Maurice Sendak's very entertaining pictures- all kind of round and angly and spidery at the same time- are perfect for Ruth Krauss's verses. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GOODNIGHT GOODNIGHT SLEEPYHEAD by Ruth Krauss
BEDTIME BOOK
Released: May 1, 2004

"Short, sweet—and comfortably familiar. (Picture book. 3-5)"
Krauss's blatant variation on Goodnight Moon, originally published as Eyes, Nose, Fingers, Toes (1964) with illustrations by Elizabeth Schneider, gets an intimate remake thanks to Dyer's gentle sleepy-time scenes of a chubby, rosebud-lipped toddler surrounded by plush companions—each of which (child included) gets put to bed to a rhythmic litany: "Goodnight windows / Goodnight doors / Goodnight walls / Goodnight floors." Read full book review >