Search Results: "Ruth Rendell"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 4, 1979

"Second-string Rendell, then—which means, by any other standards, perfectly solid and tremendously intelligent, invisibly stylish work."
Five Inspector Wexford stories that show Rendell at her least distinctive—the full-length Wexfords and non-Wexford novels and stories are all superior—but Rendell never sinks below a certain, remarkably high, level. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GIRL NEXT DOOR by Ruth Rendell
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Nov. 4, 2014

"The sedate pace and sociological focus of Rendell's recent work (No Man's Nightingale, 2013, etc.) are quickened here by the capacity of her golden agers to act, and act out, in ways as surprising as they are logical."
Rendell's 65th novel shows the incalculable effects of a 70-year-old crime on a group of friends—schoolchildren when it happened, alarmingly unpredictable retirees now. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TO FEAR A PAINTED DEVIL by Ruth Rendell
Released: Aug. 6, 1965

"A natty, chatty English countryside affair, quite good of its kind."
This is a comfortable, old-fashioned novel of suspense bearing the classic puzzler symbol of the Crime Club series. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KISSING THE GUNNER'S DAUGHTER by Ruth Rendell
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: June 1, 1992

"The story marks a masterful return to form for the supreme living exponent of the English detective story."
Rendell's last few books haven't been up to her extraordinarily high standard, but Chief Inspector Wexford's first appearance since The Veiled One (1988) is cause for celebration. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HARM DONE by Ruth Rendell
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Nov. 3, 1999

"A little slow, a little labored, but crammed with solid Rendellian virtues; the Regulars will rally round."
Kingsmarkham, where Chief Inspector Wexford labors in the interests of law and order, is one of those small English towns that's picture-postcard placid on the surface, a cauldron underneath. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MASTER OF THE MOOR by Ruth Rendell
Released: Sept. 13, 1982

"A Judgement in Stone (or even The Lake of Darkness); and it would be a pity if newcomers to Rendell got their first impression of her from this distinctly under-par effort."
It happened with Dick Francis, Ross Macdonald, and many others: a superb, underrated suspense writer finally achieves some wider recognition. . . just when he or she is producing weaker work. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE VAULT by Ruth Rendell
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Sept. 1, 2011

"Though this sequel doesn't pack the punch of the earlier novel, which never seemed in need of a sequel, it's an undoubted tour de force likely to offer enjoyment both to readers with long memories and to those approaching it as a stand-alone."
Ex-Chief Inspector Wexford returns from retirement to solve a most unlikely case: the mystery of who killed the three people whose corpses were last seen at the bottom of a coal hole in A Sight for Sore Eyes (1999). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: March 1, 1996

"A true rarity—a commonplace book about the most shocking act of all."
You wouldn't expect an ordinary anthology from Ruth Rendell, but this little book of excerpts has no precedent in the field of crime writing. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FACE OF TRESPASS by Ruth Rendell
Released: April 5, 1974

"As good a book as she's done and it could hardly be better."
In case you've forgotten, Ruth Rendell is easily the equivalent of Patricia Highsmith — a belle dame sans merci who can be amusing and unpleasant at the same time and there's no telling what will happen to poor Gray Lanceton, whose finances have totally collapsed along with his affair with a young married woman who would have liked him to dispose of her husband. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PIRANHA TO SCURFY by Ruth Rendell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 30, 2001

"Best savored not for their own achievement, but as revelations of Rendell's gift for rooting her novel-length nightmares (Harm Done, 1999, etc.) in fairy-tale fears and desires her most adult characters and readers have never outgrown."
Although Rendell's six previous collections have showcased a remarkable talent for evoking suspense in just a few pregnant pages, the nine tales here are successful in direct proportion to their length. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WOLF TO THE SLAUGHTER by Ruth Rendell
Released: May 3, 1968

"It is also by no means as exclusively feminine as her earlier books."
A definitely superior British quasi-procedural story in which three members of the police force attempt to find mod painter Margolis' sister Ann who seems to have disappeared while an anonymous letter claims she has been murdered. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CROCODILE BIRD by Ruth Rendell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 6, 1993

"And if this sedate, chilling family portrait isn't in the same class as A Judgment in Stone or Make Death Love Me, well, what is?"
A sheltered girl spins a tale of her involvement with her mother in a years-old series of killings—in this meditative Arabian Nights of murder-in-retrospect reminiscent of Rendell's Barbara Vine byline. Read full book review >