Search Results: "Ruth Sawyer"


BOOK REVIEW

THE LITTLE RED HORSE by Ruth Sawyer
Released: Sept. 8, 1950

"Full of the wonder of the sea, this is just the book for children who live near the shore, especially in the Florida region as many of the shells found there are mentioned and described."
A sunshiny tale about surf, sea shells and horses — land (not real of course) and sea varieties. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LUCK OF THE ROAD by Ruth Sawyer
Released: March 16, 1934

"Every bookshop has a list of customers, hard to please in the welter of modern fiction, for whom this is ideal."
The kind of old-fashioned sentiment with which few honest readers quarrel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A COTTAGE FOR BETSY by Ruth Sawyer
Released: Sept. 1, 1954

"A 'let's pretend we're king and queen on holiday' story."
This doesn't measure up to those favorite Ruth Sawyer books, from Roller Skates of some years back to Maggie Rose and Journey Cake, Ho! more recently. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JOURNEY CAKE, HO! by Ruth Sawyer
Released: Oct. 2, 1953

"When the trouble comes to the old woman Merry and her husband Grumble, and they must send Johnny away, his run home after Merry's parting gift and with pig, cow, sheep and chickens following, will have you panting at the end."
A rollicking, rhythmic mountain folktale tells of the wonderful way in which Johnny the bound out boy chased the Journey Cake all the way home and brought all the lost back to his keepers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JOY TO THE WORLD by Ruth Sawyer
Released: Sept. 15, 1966

"The delicate black and brown ink drawings by Trina Schart Hyman incorporate attractive peasant stylization, but are secondary to the text."
From the very well-known author/storyteller—a spread of six unusual and varied Christmas stories from five nations, each introduced by an appropriate carol. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAGGIE ROSE by Ruth Sawyer
Released: Sept. 17, 1952

"September publication of a Christmas tale."
Maggie Rose is almost too good to be true, but Ruth Sawyer's unfailing magic makes her real, and brings smiles and tears to her readers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WAY OF THE STORYTELLER by Ruth Sawyer
Released: March 20, 1942

"Fascinating reading and first rate material."
A sound and inspiring review of story telling, its history, its rewards, what can be learned about it and what can't. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LEAST ONE by Ruth Sawyer
Released: Oct. 17, 1941

"A story that might, perhaps, be better read aloud or told to children, since vocabulary and thought seem frequently above the age level of the interest."
It takes a very special sort of skill to interweave fantasy and realism and Ruth Sawyer has that skill. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THIS WAY TO CHRISTMAS by Ruth Sawyer
Released: Jan. 1, 1916

"The beloved Maginel Wright Barney illustrations in full color have nostalgic value for those who knew the book a generation ago but may seem old-fashioned today."
Another showing of this pleasant Christmas story, first published in 1916. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: March 6, 1967

"In the words of Antonio, the wise guide, this is 'a gift between friends.'"
A year in Spain in the 1930s provided Ruth Sawyer with many of the folk tales and legends— The Frog, Juan Cigarron, The Three Kings Ride-which have become favorites in and out of the library; here she provides the story behind the stories within a personal narrative of a rich year. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: March 11, 1964

"The quaint yarn of country folk in the stage coach days (which is also a brief nostalgic tribute to a mutt) is nearly plotless; it is easy reading and moving for it ends with the abrupt news of Daddles' death."
Daddles belonged to the Monroes, natives of a Maine village, who used him for hunting, but, for two summers, he lived with Snoodie and her brother Peterkin. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 7, 1960

"An unusual Christmas story which could become classic."
Ruth Sawyer, whose children's books have delighted several generations of young readers, now writes of Mexico and its link to the far east. Read full book review >