Search Results: "Ruth White"


BOOK REVIEW

A MONTH OF SUNDAYS by Ruth White
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 11, 2011

"Homey and bland as a bowl of grits without gravy. (Historical fiction. 10-14)"
A sweet but slight Southern family story. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BUTTERMILK HILL by Ruth White
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 8, 2004

Ten-year-old Piper Berry of Buttermilk Hill, North Carolina, knows better than anyone how important it is to follow one's dreams. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SEARCH FOR BELLE PRATER by Ruth White
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 12, 2005

"It doesn't hurt to say that Woodrow finds his mama, and most—but not all—of the magic comes from loving and giving. (Fiction. 8-12)"
All of the readers who longed to know what happened to Woodrow Prater's mom from the Newbery Honor Belle Prater's Boy (1996) will be deeply satisfied by this elegantly conceived sequel with its tiny glints of magic. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WEEPING WILLOW by Ruth White
FICTION
Released: May 27, 1992

"Beautifully written, heartwarming, and—ultimately—joyous. (Fiction. 12+)"
The author of the much-praised Sweet Creek Holler (1988, ALA Notable) returns to her native Appalachia for a mellower, less melodramatic story about a bittersweet coming of age in the 1950's. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TADPOLE by Ruth White
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 11, 2003

"Written in a vivid drawl, this optimistic confection is all Southern sweetness. (Fiction. 10-12)"
"Them loud-mouthed Collins girls," Kentucky, Virginia, Georgia, and narrator Carolina, receive a responsibility makeover in this sweetly slight coming-of-age story set in rural Kentucky in 1955. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

YOU'LL LIKE IT HERE (EVERYBODY DOES) by Ruth White
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 14, 2011

"A quirky commentary on age, environment, government and self-expression. (Science fiction. 11-14)"
When aggressive xenophobia closes in, it's time to record memories in a mysterious whistle, pile into an invisible spaceship and optimistically fly to another planet. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WAY DOWN DEEP by Ruth White
FICTION
Released: April 3, 2007

"Those new to White will want to read all of the work by this master of Appalachian storytelling. (map, cast of characters) (Fiction. 10+)"
On the first day of summer in 1944, a little redheaded girl is found abandoned on the steps of the courthouse in Way Down Deep, W.Va. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MEMORIES OF SUMMER by Ruth White
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 29, 2000

"Memorable. (Fiction. 10-13)"
When 13-year-old Lyric and 16-year-old Summer move from Glory Bottom, Virginia, to Flint, Michigan, in 1955, life changes for them in ways no one would have expected. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LITTLE AUDREY by Ruth White
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 4, 2008

"Though the real Audrey died in 1993, she shines in these pages—a beautiful, quiet heroine who takes on the burden of remembering. (Historical fiction. 10-14)"
White speaks through her older sister Audrey's voice in this mostly autographical account of life in a Virginia coal camp in 1948. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

A LEAGUE OF HER OWN
by Leila Roy

“I want you to do this because you genuinely want to play, not because—well, because you feel the weight of historical responsibility.”
“Can’t both be true?” Jill asked.
“I don’t know,” her mother said. “Can they?”
She sure hoped so.
A Season of Daring Greatly, by Ellen Emerson White

High school senior Jill Cafferty had ...


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BLOG POST

NEW IN FEBRUARY 2017
by Leila Roy

Is it too late to put together a short list of the February books I’m looking forward to? Ah well, I’m sorry—that question was clearly disingenuous, because obviously I’ve made the list regardless. There are so, so many new releases to be excited about, and the fact that I have a big pile of them on hand makes the sixteen ...


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BLOG POST

READING ACROSS THE COUNTRY MAINE
by Leila Roy

One of the funny things about living in a state nicknamed ‘Vacationland’—especially living near the coast—is that, for locals, a huge part of summertime is about avoiding the tourist-heavy spots. You know, like the beach.

So, rather than actually leaving our houses and enjoying these lovely, lovely days in public, a large percentage of us Year-Rounders do quite a lot ...


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