Search Results: "S. D. Crockett"


BOOK REVIEW

D/S by Gary S. Kadet
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: June 1, 2000

"Markers along the way are decadence, depravity, and sleaze."
Fade in on Perry Patetick, the anti-hero of this so-called anti-love story, as he's about to lose his newspaper job and drift into the world of S&M, in particular D/S—D for "Dominance," S for "submission." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

S. by Slavenka Drakulic
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2000

"This one is more painful than most."
Justly acclaimed as a journalist and an essayist, Drakuli—chose the novel for her latest tale of the terrors of the breakup of the former Yugoslavia. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

S by John Updike
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 12, 1988

"Possible moral here: a rage for symmetry isn't always an artist's best friend."
A companion piece to Roger's Version, this is Updike updating Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter by having Hester Prynne—here, Sarah Worth—get her two cents in as well. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

S. by J.J. Abrams
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 29, 2013

"Beguiling. For fans of mysteries, postmodern fiction and fine bookmaking: a book that makes demands of its reader, but that amply entertains in return."
A delightful, endlessly unfolding fiction that is meta beyond meta, a sort of Da Vinci Code for smart people. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DAVID CROCKETT by III Groneman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 2005

"A small survey of many virtues; it holds to the middle ground between hagiography and debunking, making allowances for Crockett's lapses into bad behavior while highlighting his better qualities."
Hero or opportunist? Rebel or terrorist? Did he even own a coonskin cap? Davy Crockett was an enigma in his own age—and certainly the right man in the wrong place at the wrong time. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DAVID CROCKETT by Michael Wallis
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 16, 2011

"An excellent study likely to tick off the hagiographers."
He wasn't born on a mountaintop in Tennessee, and he didn't kill a b'ar when he was only three. Even so, David Crockett was a force of nature, as this fine biography details. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HISS-S-S-S! by Eric A. Kimmel
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2012

"With a disappointing lack of emotion and humor, the story feels less like a boy's adventure with his first pet and more like a manual on how to (and how not to) care for a pet snake. (Fiction. 7-12)"
Ophidiophobes beware! Readers who aren't genuine snake lovers will likely find it difficult to sink their fangs into this tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FOUR D by Gregory Morrison
Released: Nov. 23, 2011

"A grab-bag of fables that baffle but also beguile."
Confused people with hazy longings confront mysterious forces in this collection of four enigmatic stories. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

D-DAY by Jonathan Mayo
NON-FICTION
Released: May 20, 2014

"An accessible history that conveys the havoc and vast international spread of D-Day."
An engrossing work that cuts and pastes chaotic events for order and sense in a manner very much like fiction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

D-DAY by Rick Atkinson
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 6, 2014

"Within its limits, a grand and historically significant tale told with dash and authority. (maps, charts, lists of major armies and figures, weaponry, personal supplies, timelines, photos) (Nonfiction. 11-13)"
This version of the much-admired The Guns at Last Light (2013) for younger audiences focuses on the drama and the astonishing scale of one of World War II's pivotal operations: the D-Day invasion. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 12, 2001

"A moving reminder of the power of the human will."
A touching first-person account of a doughty political activist who walked from California to Washington, D.C., to promote campaign-finance reform. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

D-DAY by Antony Beevor
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 13, 2009

"Beevor gets better with each book."
The grand Allied invasion of Normandy had myriad ways to go wrong, writes historian Beevor (The Mystery of Olga Chekhova, 2004, etc.) in this skilled account. Miraculously, it did not. Read full book review >