Search Results: "Sam Leith"


BOOK REVIEW

THE COINCIDENCE ENGINE by Sam Leith
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 7, 2012

"Leith's narrative runs mildly manic after a while, but the dichotomy between his unruffled prose and the mad events at hand ultimately foster a savvy comedic groove."
When a British student comes to possess a physics-bending device, all hell breaks loose on his journey across America. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 2012

"Required reading for aspiring writers, lawyers, politicians and marketers."
Former Daily Telegraph literary editor Leith (The Coincidence Engine, 2012, etc.) brings to life a forgotten but eternally essential subject. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ANCIENT REALM by Sarah Leith Bahn
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Dec. 21, 2010

"Bahn presents a straightforward fantasy story plenty capable of engaging young readers, especially those with limited attention spans."
Nature acts as a secret source of magic and mayhem for the young protagonist in Bahn's debut novel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A LOVESOME THING by Prue Leith
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 2004

"Intelligent summer reading, light but perceptive about the many passions that obsess and delight. Gardeners will especially appreciate."
A love story with a difference, as English cookbook author and third-novelist Leith (Sisters, 2002, etc.) deftly portrays an Englishwoman smitten with a famous garden—and the two men who vie for her heart. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SISTERS by Prue Leith
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2002

"Light fare, though with lots of mouthwatering descriptions of yummy food."
A second novel (after Leaving Patrick, 2001) from the doyenne of British cooking serves up a potentially zesty if uneven mix of sibling rivalry and true love. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE RIDDLED NIGHT by Valery Leith
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Aug. 8, 2000

"Messy, certainly, and sometimes slow, but the real attraction here, as in book one, is Leith's shimmering, vaulting imagination: complex, enigmatic, seemingly limitless, her creations nonetheless have a satisfyingly plausible shape and weight and structure."
Second part of Leith's trilogy (The Company of Glass, 1999) about the land of Everien and its ancient, bizarre, half-forgotten magic. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LEAVING PATRICK by Prue Leith
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2001

"Diverting light fare that entertains agreeably."
One of England's most noted chefs (two television shows, twelve cookbooks) offers up a delicious debut novel of love gone cold but then reheated. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 26, 2005

"Much too deep contemplation of his navel, even for a skilled writer."
British journalist Leith is a fat man talking, and no jolly Falstaff is he in this confessional binge. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WAY OF THE ROSE by Valery Leith
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Sept. 4, 2001

"Though newcomers won't want to start here, readers who've followed Leith through the two previous fascinating, hypercomplicated, multidimensional puzzle-boxes will be delighted."
Conclusion to Leith's remarkable fantasy trilogy (The Company of Glass, 1999; The Riddled Night, 2000) about the magical land of Everien, previously a battleground between various barbarian tribes and the Pharician Empire, once—in the distant past, or the far future—home to a culture of astounding complexity and accomplishments, now carved into isolated territorial blocks (time runs at different rates within each block) by the time-serpent unleashed by Jaya Paradox. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IRONING JOHN by James Leith
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 1, 1996

"This bloke surely entertains his mates, and if an Englishman in an apron is your cuppa orange pekoe, why here's a nice cuppa."
While his wife (``the Househead'') took a year to compose a biography of the prime minister, British food critic and quondam actor Leith reversed roles with her and assumed the tile of ``the Houseworm.'' He now sends a report of what he dubs ``the Major Year'' across the pond to entertain the folks hereabouts. Read full book review >