Search Results: "Samuel Muggington"


BOOK REVIEW

FORCE FOR GOOD by Samuel Muggington
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Sept. 20, 2013

"A surprisingly upbeat thriller with loads of charm."
After a young boy is shot and killed, a group of high-school friends wages a digital war against a local gang in Muggington's (People of the Stones, 2013, etc.) techno-thriller. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Who's The Lucky Guy? by Samuel Muggington
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 20, 2015

"Not the most simpatico protagonist, but continuous mishaps make for a gloriously absurd tale."
A recently unemployed and terminally ill man's scheme to make millions growing saffron inadvertently sparks an international incident in Muggington's (Pomroy's World: Alone, 2015, etc.) droll comedy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

The Abscission Zone by Samuel Muggington
FICTION & LITERATURE

"A gonzo but incoherent sci-fi story."
Plants threaten human existence in Muggington's (Who's the Lucky Guy?, 2015, etc.) interplanetary thriller.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WAGA'S BIG SCARE by Samuel Hiti
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2012

"The ending may leave younger or more sensitive readers unsettled, so save this slim, adrenaline-fueled tale for those who crave a true, if ephemeral, fright. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Waga is a monster that is mean, tricky and possesses the "biggest scare." But when Waga loses that scare, the monster's very existence is in jeopardy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AS LUCK WOULD HAVE IT by Samuel Lock
Released: Dec. 1, 1995

"Told in the voice of a now older and wiser Richard, Lock's charming, conversational novel is enchanting enough that gaps in the story don't seem to matter."
A first novel by British playwright and screenwriter Lock offers an endearing coming-of-age fable set in London in the 1950s. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 1992

"God-fearers), but his study reinforces the perception that his subjects live in a simply perceived world of theological givens."
An ethnographer's safari into the black-and-white world of Ultra-Orthodox Jews. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2016

"The author's research is commendable, but it swamps readers with too many details."
How an 1897 boxing match helped make cinema history. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1991

"More suggestive than conclusive in its analysis of the validity of the myth, Hynes's account of the impact of a terrible war is still rich and satisfying. (Sixteen-page photo insert—not seen.)"
Continuing the ground-breaking work of Paul Fussell in The Great War and Modern Memory, Hynes (Flights of Passage, 1988, etc.; Literature/Princeton) looks into the origin and impact of the myth that came into being to explain the significance of WW I. That myth depicted an idyllic England shattered irrevocably by the onslaught of a cruel and unnecessary way, by a generation of brave and idealistic young men lost in trench warfare prolonged by stupid generals and unimaginative politicians, and by the subsequent rejection by the embittered survivors of the values of their society. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 1, 2010

"Despite a few duds, this is a well-made anthology, of much interest to students of world literature and of the contemporary Arab world."
A well-conceived gathering of poems, short stories and other work by 39 Arab writers under the age of 40. Read full book review >