Search Results: "Sandra M . Gilbert"


BOOK REVIEW

THE CULINARY IMAGINATION by Sandra M. Gilbert
NON-FICTION
Released: July 28, 2014

"Gilbert wears her scholarship lightly in this warm, lively inquiry into the social, political, ethical and aesthetic meanings of 'food, glorious food!'"
A literary scholar investigates the cultural meaning of food. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 2, 2011

"Spanning four decades, ranging from groundbreaking excavations to magisterial syntheses, this stimulating volume reminds us how much feminism has changed and grown since the 1970s."
Uneven but rewarding collection of essays by poet and pioneering feminist scholar Gilbert (Death's Door: Modern Dying and the Ways We Grieve, 2006, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 2006

"A scholarly, well-researched work that assumes, even demands, a strong interest in contemporary English-language literature."
Cross-disciplinary study of the ways that shifts in cultural attitudes and beliefs have altered how death is mourned and the dead memorialized. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WRONGFUL DEATH by Sandra M. Gilbert
NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 20, 1995

"Powerful testimony to the painful truth that worst-case scenarios really do happen."
A wrenching tale of medical mistakes, death, shock, grief, and frustration, told with love and anger. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: July 1, 2000

"A book bound up in life's crushing and generous embrace."
Gilbert (No Man's Land, 1994, etc.) has published five books of poetry since 1979, but is best known as a feminist critic and editor. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: March 1, 2001

"A telling collection of poets at their best in the face of life's worst moments."
The ways of grief are varied and scary, asserts editor Gilbert (English/Univ. of California), particularly in today's climate of "mounting theological and social confusion." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 21, 1994

"A satisfying conclusion to an ambitious project."
The final third of this feminist literary study maintains the quality of volumes I (The War of the Words, 1987) and II (Sexchanges, 1989) as it looks at women writers' exploration of our century's complex and ever-shifting cultural scene, particularly the thorny question of gender. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EATING WORDS by Sandra M. Gilbert
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Oct. 26, 2015

"Useful as a textbook, the volume is a rewarding read for anyone who eats, cooks, or muses about food."
A literary feast for foodies. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SOCCER BEAT by Sandra Gilbert Brüg
ANIMALS
Released: July 1, 2003

"The Rockets' number 1 is a wild boar, making this a real kick for young soccer players. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Newcomer Brüg scores points for rhythm and rhyme in this energetic depiction of a soccer match between a bunch of animals. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GIANT STEPS by Gilbert M. Gaul
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 22, 1993

"An effective plea for changing how society deals with the chronically disabled, and an appealing story of parents struggling to do their best for their disabled son. (Photos.)"
Two-time Pulitzer-winning journalist Gaul, who reports on medical economics and health policy for The Philadelphia Inquirer, brings his special skills to the story of his son Cary, born six years ago with spina bifida. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 25, 2015

"Gaul's reporting is unassailable, but watch as his conclusions stir up a furor in the sports press. You don't even have to hate football to find this book valuable—and certainly worth reading."
Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter Gaul (Giant Steps, 1993) follows the money straight into the end zone, locker room, and alumni skybox.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KELLY IN THE MIRROR by Martha M. Vertreace
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1993

"Still, the author makes a good debut with her nicely honed text and realistic dialogue; her depiction of this affectionate African-American family is warm and wholesome, while Speidel's richly toned impressionistic pastels are full of good humor. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Not realizing how much Kelly worries because she isn't included in their comparisons, her family talks constantly about how much Bryan looks like Daddy and Erin looks like Mamma. Read full book review >