Search Results: "Sandy Tolan"


BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 2, 2006

"Humane and literate—and rather daring in suggesting that the future of the Middle East need not be violent."
The affecting story of an unlikely truce, even a peace, between Palestinians and Israelis in contested territory. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 2000

"Amiable on the surface, tough-minded beneath, with a fan's fervor at the core."
A highly personal account of one man's boyhood admiration for Hank Aaron, and a reevaluation of his feelings from adult perspective. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN OF THE STONE by Sandy Tolan
NON-FICTION
Released: April 21, 2015

"A resolute, heart-rending story of real change and possibility in the Palestinian-Israeli impasse."
Musicians who play together break down the barriers separating them. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LISTEN! by Stephanie S. Tolan
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 2006

"Touching and heartwarming. (Fiction. 11-14)"
In the hands of a less-talented author, the story of a half-wild dog and the heartbroken girl who tames him might have descended into saccharine sentimentality. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

APPLEWHITES AT WIT'S END by Stephanie S. Tolan
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 8, 2012

"Readers who liked the first book will appreciate this one, too, and the glimmerings of a few romances on the horizon will satisfy. (Fiction. 10-13)"
In Newbery Honor-winning Surviving the Applewhites (2002), Jake Semple, the big-city "bad kid," didn't know how he'd manage a year with that irrepressible clan. In this sequel Jake's back, but it's the Applewhites who don't know how or if they'll make it. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OTTO’S TRUNK by Sandy Turner
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 1, 2003

"An overcharged solution to a school or playground problem. (Picture book. 4-6)"
Otto, the elephant, is teased continuously at school for his small size and underdeveloped trunk. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GROW UP by Sandy Turner
by Sandy Turner, illustrated by Sandy Turner
FICTION
Released: April 1, 2003

"He also gives suggested ages as 4-88, which says it all. (Picture book. 4+)"
"What are you going to be when you grow up?" is the question that kicks off this career-minded frolic and what follows is one boy's epic response. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A GIRAFFE ON THE MOON by Sandy Nightingale
BEDTIME BOOK
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"The carefully designed illustrations are a pleasure; the concluding surprise is sure to delight the picture book audience. (Picture book. 3-6)"
At first glance, this American debut by a skillful British painter looks like a rather pointless collection of incongruities (``I didn't expect to see...a snowman on a very hot day...an elephant in a salad sandwich,'' etc.), even though the scenes are amusingly contrived and the attractive borders, composed of items that are (or might have been) in the illustrations, provide a matching game plus much to discuss. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FACE IN THE MIRROR by Stephanie S. Tolan
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 15, 1998

"Tolan (Welcome to the Ark, 1996, etc.) painlessly incorporates information about staging, interpretation, and Shakespeare; young thespians may like this even more than mystery fans will, for the emphasis on ghosts and theatrics often outstrips plotting and motives. (Fiction. 10-14)"
Fascinating details about the workings of a theater and the art and craft of acting are woven into this story of a complicated family and an even more complicated ghost. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FLIGHT OF THE RAVEN by Stephanie S. Tolan
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"Only for committed fans of part one. (Fiction. 10-15)"
A slow-moving sequel to Tolan's Welcome to the Ark (1996) in which Elijah, a young African-American empath who has escaped from a juvenile mental health facility in the Adirondacks, becomes entangled in a domestic terrorist organization. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ORDINARY MIRACLES by Stephanie S. Tolan
Released: Sept. 29, 1999

"The characterization of Mark is both well-rounded and believable; readers will identify with this down-to-earth teenager as he struggles to find his own identity, understand the values of his parents, and come to his own conclusions about the merits of faith and science. (Fiction. 12-14)"
Raised in a Christian family by a father who is a staunch fundamentalist minister, twins Matthew and Mark Filkins come to terms with their religious beliefs when a Nobel Prize-winning geneticist returns to the town of Bradyville, Ohio. Read full book review >