Search Results: "Sarah C. Rutherford"


BOOK REVIEW

THANKSGIVING by Sam Sifton
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 30, 2012

"A brief, straightforward guide to hosting a Thanksgiving dinner without being overwhelmed."
An easy-to-read, concise, somewhat tongue-in-cheek guide for how to host the perfect Thanksgiving dinner. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

C by Tom McCarthy
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2010

"Flawed but fascinating."
An ambitious, epochal second novel from the author of Remainder (2007). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SARAH by Marek Halter
Released: May 4, 2004

"Halter fleshes out the scriptural account with rich and credible portraits of contemporary life and history, even if his narration ('There was a quivering in her belly that had nothing to do with fear or anger') occasionally descends to the level of the bodice-buster."
The prizewinning French author re-creates the story of Abraham and Sarah and the unlikely steps that led to their giving birth to both Judaism and the Jewish people. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SARAH by J.T. LeRoy
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 2000

"Not exactly a laugh riot, but not as unrelievedly sordid as a plot synopsis might suggest."
Scary, sad, and way, way out there, Leroy's picaresque debut novel follows a young boy through southern truckstops, where "lot lizards" turn tricks for drivers whose tastes run from women to transvestites to boys in jeans. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FORMAT C: by Edwin Black
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 15, 1999

"Others, perhaps, will not, although Black throughout shows great smarts and at times displays virtuoso rhetoric. (First printing of 50,000; $150,000 ad/promo; author tour)"
Massively conceived, neatly chiseled computer novel that begins on the wrong foot with lists of consumer goods enjoyed by a sybaritic hero only a Honda Del Sol salesman could love. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MIDDLE C by William H. Gass
Released: March 12, 2013

"Gass, now 88, clearly has endings on his mind, which he addresses with fearsome brio and wit."
Misanthropy, atrocity, the Midwest—Gass revisits some familiar themes in this novel, though this ride is smoother than its epic predecessor, The Tunnel (1995). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 8, 2005

"An Israeli version of Anthony Swofford's Jarhead (2004), both hard-nosed and thoughtful—and most illuminating."
A nuanced view of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict by a former foot soldier in the long war. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

COMPANY C by John Sack
NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 1995

"Readers in search of a gritty grunt's-eye view of the Gulf War will be far better served by Carsten Stroud's estimable Iron Bravo (1995)."
A journalist's perfervid, impressionistic, and ultimately pointless take on an American armored unit that survived Desert Storm with a minimum of combat casualties. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHUNNING SARAH by Julie Kramer
Released: Aug. 7, 2012

"Riley's obtuseness makes her a uniquely incompetent detective, an investigative reporter constantly surprised by developments less likely to ambush seasoned genre fans."
Another hot tip from her best informant, her mother, leads TV reporter Riley Spartz (Killing Kate, 2011, etc.) far from the Twin Cities to a murder among the Amish community in misnamed Harmony, Minn. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SARAH CONLEY by Ellen Gilchrist
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Gilchrist keeps you in the palm of her hand when she tells a story, even if it's one that won't be remembered half an hour after it's over."
The 13th work of fiction from Gilchrist (The Courts of Love, 1996, etc.), who here tries to give the standard midlife crisis story some fresh vigor by dropping a suddenly eligible old flame into the cast of characters. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SARAH CANARY by Karen Joy Fowler
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 16, 1991

Fowler's remarkable debut recounts the 19-century adventures of a mysterious wild woman—and of the Chinese railway worker, insane-asylum escapee, suffragette, and exhibiter of circus freaks who pursue her through the Washington Territory—in this baroque tale of mystery, cruelty, and wonder as bombastically excessive as Barnum and Bailey itself. Read full book review >