Search Results: "Sarah Jamila Stevenson"


BOOK REVIEW

THE TRUTH AGAINST THE WORLD by Sarah Jamila Stevenson
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 8, 2014

"A fresh-air alternative to claustrophobic dystopias. (Ghost story. 11-15)"
Two teens thousands of miles apart discover they're haunted by the same desperate ghost. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LATTE REBELLION by Sarah Jamila Stevenson
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Jan. 1, 2011

Shy Asha Jamison is snowed under with AP classes, college-application essays and the sky-high expectations of her Indian-American mom and Mexican-Irish-American dad. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

UNDERNEATH by Sarah Jamila Stevenson
YOUNG ADULT
Released: June 8, 2013

"This frustratingly slow-moving tale with more depth than breadth takes readers on a profound journey even if it ends not far from where it began. (Fiction. 12 & up)"
Like her name, Sunshine Pryce-Shah is a cultural hybrid with Pakistani and American hippie roots. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SARAH by Marek Halter
Released: May 4, 2004

"Halter fleshes out the scriptural account with rich and credible portraits of contemporary life and history, even if his narration ('There was a quivering in her belly that had nothing to do with fear or anger') occasionally descends to the level of the bodice-buster."
The prizewinning French author re-creates the story of Abraham and Sarah and the unlikely steps that led to their giving birth to both Judaism and the Jewish people. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SARAH by J.T. LeRoy
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 2000

"Not exactly a laugh riot, but not as unrelievedly sordid as a plot synopsis might suggest."
Scary, sad, and way, way out there, Leroy's picaresque debut novel follows a young boy through southern truckstops, where "lot lizards" turn tricks for drivers whose tastes run from women to transvestites to boys in jeans. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FANNY STEVENSON by Alexandra Lapierre
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 1995

"Published in a smooth and unobtrusive translation from the French, this book is difficult to put down."
Sprawling over the boundary between biography and fiction, a tale of the passionate adventures of Mrs. Robert Louis Stevenson (18411918). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BOB STEVENSON by Richard Wiley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 11, 2016

"A romantic comedy with just enough of a philosophical edge."
This slight, sweet novel is haunted—in a good way—by the ghost of Robert Louis Stevenson. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON by Beverly Gherman
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"Gherman (E.B. White, 1992, etc.) tells a fine tale herself, making Stevenson and his world vivid to readers. (b&w photos, notes, bibliography, index) (Biography. 8-12)"
In this work, subtitled ``Teller of Tales,'' readers learn what an incredibly romantic life Stevenson led. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Dec. 1, 1994

"Nonetheless, Stevenson's charm is visible in every letter and essay quoted in this noteworthy biography. (16 pages b&w photos)"
In time for the centenary of Stevenson's death, this weighty biography ballasts the romantic version of his life, from his wild youth in Edinburgh to his exile in Samoa, with an integrated appreciation of Scotland's best writer. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SIMPLY SARAH by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 2006

"Ink-and-wash drawings add visual appeal. (Fiction. 7-9)"
Naylor continues her series featuring "Idea Girl" Sarah Simpson in a pigeon disaster that takes place outside her Chicago apartment window. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DIVINE SARAH by Adam Braver
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2004

"A journey into the heart of acting that's ever entertaining but at times transcendentally overblown."
Sarah Bernhardt's declining years, as highly fictionalized as Braver's debut, Mr. Lincoln's Wars (2003). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

REMEMBERING SARAH by Chris Mooney
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: April 1, 2004

"Mooney (World Without End, 2001, etc.) offers a sympathetic protagonist in a compelling situation, and for some that will be enough to get them through the storm of wildly implausible plotting that blows up toward the end."
A young girl is stolen in a near-miss psychological thriller, Mooney's third, triggering guilt, blame, and violence as bitter by-products. Read full book review >