Search Results: "Sarah S. Kilborne"


BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 16, 2012

"A compelling, comprehensive biography of a man who contributed much to American manufacturing—perfect for readers who like to root for the underdog."
Biography of William Skinner, "a leading founder of the American silk industry," from Skinner's great-great-granddaughter. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PEACH AND BLUE by Sarah S. Kilborne
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 3, 1994

"Unlikely pairings, but here they work just fine. (Fiction/Picture book. 3-7)"
Can a parochial toad find his everlasting in a peach bitten by wanderlust? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SARAH by Marek Halter
Released: May 4, 2004

"Halter fleshes out the scriptural account with rich and credible portraits of contemporary life and history, even if his narration ('There was a quivering in her belly that had nothing to do with fear or anger') occasionally descends to the level of the bodice-buster."
The prizewinning French author re-creates the story of Abraham and Sarah and the unlikely steps that led to their giving birth to both Judaism and the Jewish people. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SARAH by J.T. LeRoy
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 2000

"Not exactly a laugh riot, but not as unrelievedly sordid as a plot synopsis might suggest."
Scary, sad, and way, way out there, Leroy's picaresque debut novel follows a young boy through southern truckstops, where "lot lizards" turn tricks for drivers whose tastes run from women to transvestites to boys in jeans. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

S. by Slavenka Drakulic
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2000

"This one is more painful than most."
Justly acclaimed as a journalist and an essayist, Drakuli—chose the novel for her latest tale of the terrors of the breakup of the former Yugoslavia. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

S by John Updike
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 12, 1988

"Possible moral here: a rage for symmetry isn't always an artist's best friend."
A companion piece to Roger's Version, this is Updike updating Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter by having Hester Prynne—here, Sarah Worth—get her two cents in as well. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

S. by J.J. Abrams
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 29, 2013

"Beguiling. For fans of mysteries, postmodern fiction and fine bookmaking: a book that makes demands of its reader, but that amply entertains in return."
A delightful, endlessly unfolding fiction that is meta beyond meta, a sort of Da Vinci Code for smart people. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HISS-S-S-S! by Eric A. Kimmel
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2012

"With a disappointing lack of emotion and humor, the story feels less like a boy's adventure with his first pet and more like a manual on how to (and how not to) care for a pet snake. (Fiction. 7-12)"
Ophidiophobes beware! Readers who aren't genuine snake lovers will likely find it difficult to sink their fangs into this tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

S&M by Jeffrey DeShell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 1997

STATEMENT PAGE Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SIMPLY SARAH by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 2006

"Ink-and-wash drawings add visual appeal. (Fiction. 7-9)"
Naylor continues her series featuring "Idea Girl" Sarah Simpson in a pigeon disaster that takes place outside her Chicago apartment window. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DIVINE SARAH by Adam Braver
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2004

"A journey into the heart of acting that's ever entertaining but at times transcendentally overblown."
Sarah Bernhardt's declining years, as highly fictionalized as Braver's debut, Mr. Lincoln's Wars (2003). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

REMEMBERING SARAH by Chris Mooney
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: April 1, 2004

"Mooney (World Without End, 2001, etc.) offers a sympathetic protagonist in a compelling situation, and for some that will be enough to get them through the storm of wildly implausible plotting that blows up toward the end."
A young girl is stolen in a near-miss psychological thriller, Mooney's third, triggering guilt, blame, and violence as bitter by-products. Read full book review >