Search Results: "Saul Bellow"


BOOK REVIEW

SEIZE THE DAY by Saul Bellow
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 15, 1956

"For a more selective audience, a provocative collection of incidental pieces."
Bellow's curious new admixture (a long short story, several shorter, and a play) stands midway between the Kalkaesque Dangling Man and the vital, tragicomic Adventures of Augie March. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HERZOG by Saul Bellow
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 21, 1964

"It should be read."
There are two things we can say. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

COLLECTED STORIES by Saul Bellow
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2001

"One for the permanent shelf."
With the passing of Eudora Welty, our only living Nobel laureate remains virtually unchallenged as America's greatest writer of fiction (Roth, Mailer, Updike, Oates, and perhaps a handful of others). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: April 1, 1994

"Sheen and fascination come off of every page."
Bellow (Something to Remember Me By, 1991) makes it seem—in his introduction to these essays, addresses, interviews, and journalism pieces—as though he'd been reluctantly corralled into collecting them. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SOMETHING TO REMEMBER ME BY by Saul Bellow
Released: Oct. 3, 1991

In 1989, both in paperback original, appeared Bellow's hundred-page-or-so novella A Theft, followed a few months later by The Bellarosa Connection, which came in at about the same length. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HUMBOLDT'S GIFT by Saul Bellow
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 25, 1975

"Still if one is left with ''a kind of light-in-the-being'' that can overcome the terminal terror, it will represent underachiever Humboldt's great achievement."
As a critic once observed: "The language is the character and the action. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 1, 1974

"O'Gorman and Bell make this a worthwhile volume — the others beat dead horses (automobiles?)."
They're still hacking away at that tired subject, technology. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THERE IS SIMPLY TOO MUCH TO THINK ABOUT by Saul Bellow
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: March 31, 2015

"This comprehensive collection illuminates Bellow's sense of his own identity and his changing world."
A nonfiction collection celebrates the centennial of Saul Bellow's (1915-2005) birth. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BELLAROSA CONNECTION by Saul Bellow
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 10, 1989

"Subtle, complex, and tricky, a wry-toned look deep into gloom: fine, vintage Bellow in the shorter form."
Hard on the heels of Theft (1989), another Bellow 100-pager in paperback original: this time the tale of one Harry Fonstein, saved from the Holocaust by the underground organization of Broadway impresario Billy Rose (Bellarosa, to the wartime Italians), then later cold-shouldered by the show-biz celeb himself. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DEAN'S DECEMBER by Saul Bellow
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 7, 1981

"And every page of it commands the attention."
Rich yet dry and static, Bellow's somber new book (his first as Nobel laureate) is often more essay than novel: a wintery meditation on death—a death in the family, the death of American cities, the death of the planet—as filtered through the mind of Albert Corde, one of Bellow's least vivid or particularized alter egos. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HENDERSON THE RAIN KING by Saul Bellow
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 23, 1959

"Nevertheless, this is a powerful, funny and moving book that shouldn't be missed by anyone seriously interested in the American novel."
The National Book Award winner's first full length novel since The Adventures of Augie March is as bursting with life and energy as that fascinating book and has an even more absorbing hero. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RAVELSTEIN by Saul Bellow
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 24, 2000

"The work of a master, who has lost none of his unique ability to entertain, enthrall, and enlighten."
The Nobel laureate's first full-length novel in more than a decade (since More Die of Heartbreak, 1987) is a pungent intellectual drama that's short on plot but contains some of the sharpest, most provocative writing of his long and honorable career. Read full book review >