Search Results: "Seamus Heaney"


BOOK REVIEW

SEAMUS HEANEY: FIVE FABLES by Robert Henryson
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 22, 2014

"High production values brighten this feature-rich offspring of one of Heaney's last works and a BBC miniseries. (Requires iOS 7.0 and above.) (introduction, bibliography) (iPad folklore app. 10-13, adult)"
Fifteenth-century versions of five fables get lavish makeovers in this star- and feature-studded app. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FINDERS KEEPERS by Seamus Heaney
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: May 1, 2001

"A must for poets and students of poetry and a good start for initiates seeking to understand the constituent parts of its erudite codes."
A wonderful collection of the great Irish poet and critic's learned yet down-to-earth prose. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ELECTRIC LIGHT by Seamus Heaney
Released: April 1, 2001

"In this vein, Heaney has few equals; he burnishes memory to a fine tawny glow, not sentimentalizing but not shying away from feeling, the potential for bathos held in check by his great formal skills."
Nobel Laureate Heaney (Beowulf, 2000, etc.) has called words tools for digging, and his language usually has the tactility of a good toolkit. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BEOWULF by Seamus Heaney
Released: Feb. 1, 2000

Written more than a thousand years ago in the Germanic tongue from which the preNorman core of modern English is formed, Beowulf is the epic poem of the warrior hero who survived a succession of fierce trials only to languish for centuries thereafter in the entombing clutches of university scholars. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1995

"General readers beware: Despite Heaney's personal asides and deceptively casual tone, his complex line of thought is indeed that of the highfalutin Oxford lecturer."
Ten Oxford University lectures on poetry from Heaney, perhaps the best-known Irish poet in America. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DIARY OF ONE WHO VANISHED by Ozef Kalda
Released: Sept. 1, 2000

"A delightful little libretto of love at all costs results, bearing a music all its own."
In a follow-up to his grand translation of Beowulf, Heaney brings to English a tiny cycle of Czech love poems made famous by Janacek, who first set them to music in 1919. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MIDNIGHT VERDICT by Brian Merriman
Released: April 9, 2001

"Once again, Ireland's preeminent poet balances colloquialism and lyricism with deceptive ease."
Heaney's previous efforts have included "works of lyrical beauty and ethical depth, which exalt everyday miracles and the living past," for which he won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1995. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOMAGE TO ROBERT FROST by Joseph Brodsky
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"A reader or a critic or a poet would be well advised to read more of Brodsky, Heaney, and Walcott—but also to consult and consort with some true icon-smashers."
A laurel wreath for Frost hoisted by several Nobel laureates whose own poetry is published regularly by Farrar, Straus & Giroux. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: June 1, 2001

"The best part is the Historical Note, which provides an overview of the war in Vietnam and may make the volume of use to report-writers. (Fiction. 9-14)"
"I pretty much use the same words over and over, because I don't know very many," soldier Patrick Seamus Flaherty tells Doc Jarvis midway through this entry in the Dear America series. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DUGGAN'S DESTINY by Seamus Martin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1999

"Vivid, fine historical fiction, reverent and wrenching, all through the eyes of one who was there."
Irish journalist Martin's first fiction is the tale of the life—and 1847 death—of Daniel O—Connell, "Liberator" of Ireland and lifelong worker for repeal of the union with England. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GARDENER by Seamus Dunne
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 6, 1994

"The story's development is predictable and the author cuts off the action at the climax, but there is much finely observed social commentary, even if it is buried in a somewhat obvious morality tale."
An intriguing first novel by Dunne, an Irish journalist, that plays off a familiar ploy about Holocaust guilt in an unusual setting. Read full book review >