Search Results: "Sergei A. Kondrashev"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 8, 1997

"Eye-opening detail on cloak-and-dagger operations in a conquered capital city that once threatened to alter the balance of world power and breach the world's hard-won peace. (illustrations, not seen) (Author tour)"
A troika of erstwhile adversaries team up to deliver an absorbing and authoritative inside view of how American and Soviet- bloc intelligence agencies plied their offbeat trade in divided Berlin during the first 15 years of the Cold War. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GENOME by Sergei Lukyanenko
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Dec. 2, 2014

"Not quite up to the standard of Russia's greatest science-fiction writers (such as the Strugatsky brothers) but nonetheless refreshingly different and something of a page-turner: well worth investigating."
A medium-future exploration of the effects of genetic engineering, which first appeared in Russian in 1999, from the Moscow-resident author of Night Watch (2013, etc.).Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A FOREIGN WOMAN by Sergei Dovlatov
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1991

"A choice assortment of comic characters and incidents make this a wry but affectionate portrait of one of New York's newer communities."
A slight but engagingly humorous novel by Russian ÇmigrÇ Dovlatov (Ours: Scenes from Russian Family Life; The Suitcase) about life in the Russian section of Queens. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE YEAR OF THE COMET by Sergei Lebedev
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"This gorgeously written, unsettling novel—a rare work about the fall of the Soviet Union as told through the eyes of a child—leaves us with a fresh understanding of that towering moment in recent history."
Lebedev follows up Oblivion (2016), his powerful novel about the atrocities of the gulag, with this autobiographical tale of a boy's coming-of-age during the years leading to the fall of the Soviet Union. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OBLIVION by Sergei Lebedev
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 12, 2016

"Lebedev's courageous and devastating first novel, published in Russia in 2011, applies modern insight and poetic force to atrocities past and to his country's unspoken campaign to remove them from history."
Journeying across the tundra on a search through his past, a young Russian is emotionally undone by horrific remnants of gulag atrocities—and the ease with which those crimes were systematically wiped from the national consciousness. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NIKITA KHRUSHCHEV by Sergei N. Khrushchev
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 2000

"A fascinating portrait of a man of immense vitality, a fervent Communist, convinced that the Soviet Union would surpass the US, and the process by which he began subconsciously to understand that the system itself did not work."
A filial but revealing semi-biography of Nikita Khrushchev by his son, now at the Institute for International Studies at Brown. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NIKITA KHRUSHCHEV by William Taubman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 2000

"A book that underlines why Gorbachev was almost inconceivable without Khrushchev."
It's not often that the proceedings of a conference are read by anyone other than the participants (and often not even by them), but this book, originating in an international conference on the centennial of Nikitia Khrushchev's birth, is both important and even moving. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SIX SERVANTS by Wilhelm Grimm
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 1996

"As with a good ghost story, the horror here is the enticement. (Picture book/folklore. 6-10)"
Although popular culture's take on fairy tales tends to emphasize the bright side of life, Goloshapov's illustrations for this old story retain its darker aspects and fairly bristle with menace. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BRAVE LITTLE TAILOR by Jacob Grimm
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 15, 1997

One of the Grimms' more eccentric tales receives the outlandish attention of Goloshapov (The Six Servants, 1996, etc.), whose ominous illustrations give the story its due. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1994

"A masterful appreciation of the tangled webs woven in the cause of power politics during the early years of the cold war. (Forty-two maps and 42 illustrations—not seen)"
An informed and revelatory reappraisal of Sino-Soviet relations from the close of WW II through October 1950, when the People's Republic of China entered the Korean conflict. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LOVE FOR THREE ORANGES by Sergei Prokofiev
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2006

"Children (and adults) willing to set aside logic for a time will enjoy themselves mightily. (Picture book. 5-9)"
There's no getting around the surreal, mosaic quality of this tale, with its odd juxtapositions and dream illogic. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SERGEI PROKOFIEV’S PETER AND THE WOLF by Sergei Prokofiev
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 14, 2004

"There is ample precedent for tinkering with Prokofiev's masterwork, but this ending may jar those for whom the final melancholy notes of the oboe, representing the trapped duck, are the poignant, seminal moment in the story. (CD included) (Picture book. 5-9)"
A new treatment of Prokofiev's symphonic folktale in which each character is represented by a different orchestral instrument. Read full book review >