Search Results: "Shannon Baker"


BOOK REVIEW

SHANNON by Frank Delaney
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 10, 2009

"A well-crafted, satisfying work of historical fiction, as are all of Delaney's novels; respectful of the facts while not cowed by them, and full of life."
A rousing tale of forbidden love, civil war, horrible death and other things Irish. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHANNON MILLER by Claudia Miller
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 1999

"As an Olympic gymnast, Shannon Miller had the eyes of the world on her, but this overly technical treatment won—t put her on the bestseller podium where fellow gymnast Dominique Moceanu once stood. (8 color, 42 b&w illustrations, not seen)"
A proud and devoted mother's overdone portrait of her celebrated gymnast daughter's trials and triumphs. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STRIPPED BARE by Shannon Baker
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"Baker (Tattered Legacy, 2015, etc.) serves up a ballsy heroine, a colorful backdrop, and a surprising ending."
A Nebraska ranch woman's life is turned upside down by a murder. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BROKEN TRUST by Shannon Baker
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: March 8, 2014

"Overstuffed."
Baker (Tainted Mountain, 2013, etc.) presents the second adventure of a Western accountant who tries to build a new life after her marriage ends tragically. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TATTERED LEGACY by Shannon Baker
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: March 8, 2015

"Nora's third (Broken Trust, 2014, etc.) is filled with enough plotlines for several more installments. The heroine's decisions are annoyingly bad for such an allegedly intelligent woman, but the denouement still packs a punch."
An accountant risks her life as she works to protect an area of great beauty. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TAINTED MOUNTAIN by Shannon Baker
Released: March 8, 2013

"Lots of explosions, fires and crashes, but despite its exotic location, Baker's debut offers no local color and little suspense."
The future of an Arizona ski resort hangs in the balance as its owner fights environmentalists, Native American activists and uranium miners for the right to make snow. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BAKER by Paul Hond
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1998

"A bright Beaujolais of a book: fresh, optimistic, and sophisticated enough to satisfy on many levels."
A debut novel that transforms the terror of working-class, inner-city race relations into an upbeat examination of love, loss, and father-son bonding. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BAKER TOWERS by Jennifer Haigh
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 4, 2005

"Almost mythic in its ambition, somewhere between Oates and Updike country, and thoroughly satisfying."
An elegant, elegiac multigenerational saga about a small coal-mining community in western Pennsylvania that shows how talented she really is. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JOSEPHINE BAKER by Alan Schroeder
BIOGRAPHY
Released: March 29, 1991

"Useful for assignments, but not as memorable as his earlier book. (Biography. 10+)"
A workmanlike entry in the ``Black Americans of Achievement'' series. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 1, 2010

"Disappointing."
Lackluster account of the vicious murder of a soldier that became the basis for the 2007 film In the Valley of Elah. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WALTER THE BAKER by Eric Carle
FICTION
Released: March 22, 1972

"The splashy tissue-paper collages of coarsely comic peasant figures and a cozy half-timbered town are as pointlessly hybrid as the tale."
Beginning invitingly with "warm smells" of bread, rolls, cakes, tarts and cookies (and a cat perched on a red-brick oven) Walter the baker's story ends lamely when he invents the pretzel in answer to the duke's demand for a roll containing "the rising sun, the noontime sun and the setting sun" (the pretzel, Walter explains, has three holes through which the sun can shine). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE COPPER BRAID OF SHANNON O’SHEA by Laura Esckelson
FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 2003

""
Commanded by their queen, a company of sprites unbraids a girl's hair and finds more than they bargained for including buttons and thimbles, limos and taxis, even a sleeping bear in poet Esckelson's debut for children. "The copper braid of Shannon O'Shea / Was unbraided one fall on account of the hay / Which had tangled into the plaits of her hair, / But nobody knew what else snarled in there," Esckelson begins. Newton's (The Stonecutter: An Indian Folktale, 1990) sinuous illustrations, with fine black pen outlining the images, are intricately detailed, and wend their way across double-page spreads as Shannon's hair unleashes a tidal wave of wonders. Esckelson's fast-paced rhyme tells readers what to look for. As the jacket explains, she was inspired to write the story by "various myths about women's unbound hair releasing abundance and chaos into the world." She succeeds in interpreting these myths for a young audience and is perfectly teamed with Newton. Together, they immerse readers in a hairy nether world, rendering real the innumerable objects and tiny creatures that just might dwell atop our heads and inside our locks, waiting to be set free. (Picture book. 4-8)Read full book review >