Search Results: "Shannon Hitchcock"


BOOK REVIEW

SHANNON by Frank Delaney
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 10, 2009

"A well-crafted, satisfying work of historical fiction, as are all of Delaney's novels; respectful of the facts while not cowed by them, and full of life."
A rousing tale of forbidden love, civil war, horrible death and other things Irish. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BALLAD OF JESSIE PEARL by Shannon Hitchcock
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 2013

"A satisfying tale for readers who don't require a fully happy ending. (Historical fiction. 11-18)"
Jessie, 15 and living on a rural North Carolina tobacco farm in the early 1920s, dreams of graduating from high school and then attending teachers' college. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RUBY LEE AND ME by Shannon Hitchcock
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"The story is acceptable as a book about familial relationships and self-forgiveness, but it fails as the historical narrative it purports to be. (Historical fiction. 9-12)"
It's 1969, and 12-year-old Sarah's life is in turmoil. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHANNON MILLER by Claudia Miller
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 1999

"As an Olympic gymnast, Shannon Miller had the eyes of the world on her, but this overly technical treatment won—t put her on the bestseller podium where fellow gymnast Dominique Moceanu once stood. (8 color, 42 b&w illustrations, not seen)"
A proud and devoted mother's overdone portrait of her celebrated gymnast daughter's trials and triumphs. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ALFRED HITCHCOCK by Michael Wood
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 24, 2015

"The breadth of Hitchcock's career and personal life defies easy summation, but Wood's quickly paced, informative biography is a welcome primer for anyone interested in learning more about one of film's most important figures."
A brief portrait of cinema's most iconic silhouette, Alfred Hitchcock (1899-1980). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 1, 2001

"Strange how an investigation of the Master of Suspense and his world can be so humdrum, but closing with four term papers will accomplish just that. (16 pages b&w photos)"
Alfred Hitchcock Presents: Dial "T" for Tedium. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ALFRED HITCHCOCK by Peter Ackroyd
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 25, 2016

"Ackroyd writes of his enigmatic subject, 'he did not want anyone to come too close.' Alas, readers of this book will not get as close to that subject as they might like."
A celebrated biographer adds to the tall pile of biographies about cinema's master of suspense. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2003

"Master-ful. (32 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
The Master of Suspense finally gets an authoritative life. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DIAL H FOR HITCHCOCK by Susan Kandel
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Nov. 1, 2009

"Flat characters, an implausible premise and a simply preposterous conclusion."
When she's framed for murder, it's up to Californian writer and vintage fashionista Cece Caruso (Christietown, 2007, etc.) to clear her name. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HITCHCOCK MURDERS by Peter Conrad
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"Even if the argument sometimes seems like an endless series of digressions, however, it never makes less than an entertaining and illuminating case for the unity of Hitchcock's half-century of films. (20 b&w photos)"
A wide-ranging, though eccentric, tour of Alfred Hitchcock's agreeably scary cinema. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE COPPER BRAID OF SHANNON O’SHEA by Laura Esckelson
FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 2003

""
Commanded by their queen, a company of sprites unbraids a girl's hair and finds more than they bargained for including buttons and thimbles, limos and taxis, even a sleeping bear in poet Esckelson's debut for children. "The copper braid of Shannon O'Shea / Was unbraided one fall on account of the hay / Which had tangled into the plaits of her hair, / But nobody knew what else snarled in there," Esckelson begins. Newton's (The Stonecutter: An Indian Folktale, 1990) sinuous illustrations, with fine black pen outlining the images, are intricately detailed, and wend their way across double-page spreads as Shannon's hair unleashes a tidal wave of wonders. Esckelson's fast-paced rhyme tells readers what to look for. As the jacket explains, she was inspired to write the story by "various myths about women's unbound hair releasing abundance and chaos into the world." She succeeds in interpreting these myths for a young audience and is perfectly teamed with Newton. Together, they immerse readers in a hairy nether world, rendering real the innumerable objects and tiny creatures that just might dwell atop our heads and inside our locks, waiting to be set free. (Picture book. 4-8)Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 2004

"Nevertheless, it's a solid addition to the growing body of literature on the subject. (author's note) (Fiction. 10+)"
George Shannon was 16 years old when he joined the Lewis and Clark expedition in 1803. Read full book review >