Search Results: "Shannon Ravenel"


BOOK REVIEW

NEW STORIES FROM THE SOUTH by Shannon Ravenel
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1994

"In the tradition of earlier southern writers, but echoing today's sounds."
Persuasive voices, emotional depth, and a wide range of points of view distinguish these 16 stories of generally high quality. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NEW STORIES FROM THE SOUTH by Shannon Ravenel
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 11, 2003

"Both the familiar and the strange are eloquently evoked and celebrated here: a model anthology."
Editor Ravenel has cast her net widely and well, making the 18th installment of this deservedly successful series one of its best yet. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NEW STORIES FROM THE SOUTH by Shannon Ravenel
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 11, 1998

NEW STORIES FROM THE SOUTHThe Year's Best, 1998Ravenel, Shannon—Ed. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NEW STORIES FROM THE SOUTH by Shannon Ravenel
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 4, 2004

"Well-crafted tales from a laudable tradition, though Ravenal might encourage more experimental voices next time."
A mixed bag of 18 mostly unsurprising stories by names both celebrated and more regionally obscure in the 19th installment of this well-established series. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NEW STORIES FROM THE SOUTH by Shannon Ravenel
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 10, 2005

"That said, the pleasures here outdistance the shortcomings by a country mile."
The familiar annual celebrates its 20th anniversary with 19 stories that pull their imaginative starter cultures from below the Mason-Dixon Line. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NEW STORIES FROM THE SOUTH by Shannon Ravenel
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"On balance, there's enough good work here to make readers look forward to next year's selectionand to want to follow the careers of Gautreaux, Gould, Kercheval, and several of their young anthology-mates."
The tenth installment in an increasingly successful series holds few surprises but contains a fair amount of accomplished and original short fiction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NEW STORIES FROM THE SOUTH by Shannon Ravenel
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 8, 2000

"Hardly flawless, but, like its past numbers, a showcase of new talent that shores up some developing careers, and pays homage to the wonder that is southern fiction."
For the 15th anniversary of New Stories from the South, Ravenel stirs up a real gumbo of southern writing: authors of all ages—some first-timers, some long familiar to fans of this essential series. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NEW STORIES FROM THE SOUTH by Shannon Ravenel
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"Once again, southern fiction mostly at its best."
Now that this excellent series is firmly established among must-read annuals, Ravenel should skip the apologetic introductions in which she repeatedly tries to justify the regional basis for her anthology. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NEW STORIES FROM THE SOUTH by Shannon Ravenel
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 14, 2001

"No anthology satisfies all readers, but Ravenel's editorial eye is as sharp as ever, appealing to the center of the heart rather than the middle of the brow."
Sixteenth volume in one of the generally most satisfying annual anthologies of contemporary fiction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NEW STORIES FROM THE SOUTH by Shannon Ravenel
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"Despite its shortcomings, still maybe the best annual story anthology around."
Ravenel stretches her sense of southernness so far in this volume of 18 stories that even some of the contributors wonder what they're doing here, as a few comment in afterwords to their pieces. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BEST AMERICAN SHORT STORIES 1984 by Shannon Ravenel
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 15, 1984

"And, like this year's O. Henry story-collection, Updike's shrewd, professional gathering is topped by a classic that's sure to appear in anthologies for decades to come: Cynthia Ozick's scouring projection of the path of Jewish history toward Miami Beach—'Rosa."
It's not surprising, perhaps, that Updike—a dazzling critic as well as an assured, gifted story-writer—proves to be the most satisfying guest-editor of the "Best American Short Stories" series so far. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 1, 1988

"Its imperfection is its greatest attraction, in fact—which may make it the closest exemplar of what Helprin tries to get at in his chuffing introduction."
Helprin introduces his guest-selection with a John-Gardneresque screed ("Minimalists appear to be people who have not been forced to struggle, and who have not dared upon some struggle, to which they have not been forced. Read full book review >