Search Results: "Sheila Hamanaka"


BOOK REVIEW

BEBOP-A-DO-WALK! by Sheila Hamanaka
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"As was true in the early works of Ezra Jack Keats, the child-heroes welcome every adventure before them; Hamanaka makes the journey uplifting and the road home safe. (Picture book. 5-8)"
A joy-filled celebration of an exciting and even nurturing urban landscape. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PEACE CRANE by Sheila Hamanaka
FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"They may question Hamanaka's statement that Sadako folded a thousand paper cranes; as the story goes, Sadako died before she was done, and other childrenin tributecompleted her work. (Picture book. 8+)"
The African-American narrator of this apostrophic verse has heard the story of Sadako's thousand paper cranes; the crane, traditional Japanese symbol of longevity, represents her hopes for peace, both in her violent urban milieu and the world. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW


"An energetic, brightly imagined fantasy debut."
This teen fantasy debut stars a girl who learns she's a werewolf with ties to a parallel world of magic. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GRANDPARENTS SONG by Sheila Hamanaka
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2003

"Like the beautiful child who gracefully combines the sometimes conflicted heritage of her ancestors, this lovely work combines diverse artistic traditions to create a whole that is, like the American family tree, beautiful and strong. (Picture book/poetry. 6-9)"
Stunning illustrations inspired by folk art illuminate Hamanaka's song celebrating the diversity of a young American girl's heritage and her roots in the land. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SCREEN OF FROGS by Sheila Hamanaka
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1993

"A fine contribution, excellent for sharing aloud. (Folklore/Picture book. 4-10)"
An old Japanese tale that addresses a number of contemporary concerns. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ALL THE COLORS OF THE EARTH by Sheila Hamanaka
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

"Hamanaka has chosen a worthy theme, but she develops it without the humor or imagination that animates her Screen of Frogs (1993). (Picture book. 5-7)"
This heavily earnest celebration of multi-ethnicity combines full-bleed paintings of smiling children, viewed through a golden haze dancing, playing, planting seedlings, and the like, with a hyperbolic, disconnected text—``Dark as leopard spots, light as sand,/Children buzz with laughter that kisses our land...''— printed in wavy lines. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A VISIT TO AMY-CLAIRE by Claudia Mills
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 31, 1992

"The warm, realistic story is beautifully visualized in Hamanaka's vibrant oils, where the appealingly expressive Japanese-American children appear in handsomely generalized settings with minimal detail. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Five-year-old Rachel happily anticipates a family visit to her cousin Amy-Claire, seven. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

QUIET, PLEASE by Eve Merriam
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 22, 1993

"Still, this small addition to a distinguished oeuvre can be used as a concept-extender or as inspiration for similar lists, while the words benefit from Hamanaka's visualization: spare, boldly rendered compositions, glowing with luminosity and richly saturated color. (Picture book. 4-8)"
The late poet lists quiet things—``Invisible writing of butterflies''; ``Bare feet on the dewy grass at dawn''; ``Moonlight making a checkerboard on a brick wall''; etc.—more like notes for a poem than a finished work, since the language isn't especially evocative and choices such as stars, snow, milkweed, or giraffes aren't particularly unusual. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SOFIE'S ROLE by Amy Heath
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 30, 1992

"Hamanaka's boldly handsome, full-bleed oils show an ebullient, warmhearted interracial family. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A lively depiction of a family business—a bakery—on the day before Christmas, when Sofie is allowed to help behind the counter for the first time. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SCHOOL'S OUT by Johanna Hurwitz
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 24, 1991

"Totally satisfying. (Fiction. 7-11)"
After three books recounting his checkered third-grade career, likable Lucas Cott has a busy summer. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TERRIBLE EEK by Patricia A. Compton
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 18, 1991

When, on a rainy night, a man tells his little son that the things he most fears are a thief, a wolf, and a ``terrible leak,'' his words are overheard by both a thief who happens to be on the roof and a nearby wolf. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHEILA SAYS WE'RE WEIRD by Ruth Ann Smalley
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 1, 2011

"A good-humored guide to environmentally responsible behavior, all the more convincing (and refreshing) for being indirect. (Picture book. 6-8)"
Right along with a nosy young neighbor, children get an eyeful of a family's sustainable lifestyle. Read full book review >