Search Results: "Sheila Weller"


BOOK REVIEW


"An energetic, brightly imagined fantasy debut."
This teen fantasy debut stars a girl who learns she's a werewolf with ties to a parallel world of magic. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 2008

"Definitely a guilty pleasure, but still a solid contribution to the story of 20th-century popular music."
Half collective biography, half music-industry dish about three singer-songwriters who represented a generation of women on "a course of self-discovery, change, and unhappy confrontation with the limits of change." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1992

"This story is hardening into legend, with Diane here a worthy and moving foil to the outsized ego of her husband and his mishmash fantasy life."
Third book on the 1987 murder of Diane Pikul by her millionaire stock-analyst husband, this one the most intimate; by the author of the so-so novel Hansel and Gretel in Beverly Hills (1978). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 30, 2014

"Inspiring bios of today's professional heroines."
The long, lonely, unlovely scramble to making it to the top in TV news. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 2003

"Equal parts emotional tissue-party and shrewd cultural history."
Poignant memoir of a not-so-typical New York Jewish family's experiences in the midcentury Hollywood demimonde. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Dec. 1, 1997

"Solid reporting and social analysis, though a more neutral, less judgmental tone would have served the writer well. (8 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
Weller, the author of bestsellers on O.J. Simpson and Amy Fisher, offers a great deal of information, some of it stunning and not widely known, about another high-profile case: that of Alex Kelly, the one-time star high-school athlete recently found guilty of rape. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHEILA SAYS WE'RE WEIRD by Ruth Ann Smalley
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 1, 2011

"A good-humored guide to environmentally responsible behavior, all the more convincing (and refreshing) for being indirect. (Picture book. 6-8)"
Right along with a nosy young neighbor, children get an eyeful of a family's sustainable lifestyle. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHEILA RAE’S PEPPERMINT STICK by Kevin Henkes
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2001

"A winsome introduction to Henkes for younger audiences and, rarest of all, just the right amount of art for a board book. (Board book. 2-5)"
A sweet treat becomes a source of contention between two sisters in this wry tale about sibling relations and the art of sharing. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WANTING SHEILA DEAD by Jane Haddam
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Aug. 3, 2010

"Haddam (Living Witness, 2009, etc.) gleefully satirizes reality TV and offers a well-thought-out appreciation of Agatha Christie's novels, which she lets Demarkian savor for the first time."
The battles on reality television lead to murder, just as you always knew they would. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WILL SHEILA SHARE? by Elivia Savadier
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2008

"This simple story should be just at toddler and preschooler's level of understanding as well as offering some relief to frustrated adults. (Picture book. 2-5)"
There have been a number of attempts to address the difficult concept of sharing for toddlers, but Savadier approaches the topic for very young children in a very simple story. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A.K.A. SHEILA WEINSTEIN by Pat Jordan
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Aug. 1, 2003

"The silly, weightless intrigue is only an excuse for an endless round of fantasy scenes in which females with silicon enhancements and without underwear, supplemented by equally enthusiastic gay supporting players, are constantly sinking to their knees in homage to His Majesty."
Operating under still another name, that naughty 48-year-old Sheila Ryan (A.K.A. Sheila Doyle, 2002) continues to fuel the same adolescent fantasies. Read full book review >