Search Results: "Shelley Dale"


BOOK REVIEW

BEING SHELLEY by Ann Wroe
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 14, 2007

"Hallucinatory and quite mad (Shelley would approve): helpful in deciphering his work but hardly his life."
From Economist editor and biographer Wroe (The Perfect Prince, 2003, etc.), a dreamy, decidedly unorthodox biography of the Romantic poet. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ST. DALE by Sharyn McCrumb
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 18, 2005

"Still, this book of moments is required reading for anybody who still mourns Number Three—or who wonders what the fuss is about."
In a career marked by strange, wonderful stories (Ghost Riders, 2003, etc.), McCrumb offers her strangest yet: a modern-day Canterbury Tales with Dale Earnhardt replacing Thomas à Becket. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MARY SHELLEY by Miranda Seymour
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"An evocative, empathetic treatment of what was, in all senses of the word, a difficult life."
A new biography of the author of Frankenstein that aims to comprehend her character rather than assess or advance her literary standing. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MARY SHELLEY by John Williams
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 4, 2000

Most readers know Mary as Percy Shelley's wife and the author of Frankenstein, but many critics feel her writing deserves more attention. British scholar Williams (Romantic Poetry and Revolutionary Politics, 1989) aims to tell her story and evaluate her position in the 19th-century literary canon. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KATE SHELLEY by Robert D. San Souci
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"A fine alternative to Margaret Wetterer's stiffer, simpler (but no less dramatic) Kate Shelley and the Midnight Express (1990). (Picture book/nonfiction. 8-11)"
The gripping, true story of a 15-year-old Iowan who ventured out into a wild storm to give warning of a wrecked railroad bridge. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: May 31, 2014

"A contemporary and festive Latino birthday celebration. (Bilingual picture book. 3-6)"
Mateo's birthday is full of excitement, family and many things to count in English and Spanish. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 1997

"Marginal. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Texas in the 1930s is the setting for the eight episodes that make up this book. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GO AWAY, SHELLEY BOO! by Phoebe Stone
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"Children will still identify with Emily's anxiety about a new neighbor and share her relief when she finally does meet the infamous 'Shelley Boo,' who is really named Elizabeth. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Emily Louise is certain that the new girl moving in next door will be simply awful. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JUAN QUEZADA by Shelley Dale
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2003

"Libraries that have the first book on Quezada will want this one, too. (Picture book/biography. 7-10)"
The second children's picture book within a year about the famed potter, Juan Quezada of the village of Mata Ortiz, Chihuahua, Mexico, this one is very different from The Pot that Juan Built, by Nancy Andrews-Goebel, illustrated by David Diaz (2002). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HANG ON IN THERE, SHELLEY by Kate Saksena
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: June 1, 2003

"Saksena offers hope that things will get better and portrays the ups and downs of living with an alcoholic, but in the whole, this is simply unrealistic. (Fiction. 12-14)"
Ostensibly about Shelley's trying to deal with school bullies and a mother with a drinking problem, this epistolary novel consists of Shelley's letters to rock star Ziggy and his postcards in return. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GUPPIES OF HILLY DALE HOUSE by Anne Baird
ANIMALS
Released: June 28, 1991

"An appealing, useful book. (Picture book. 1-5)"
Five half-pint realistic stories about a day-care group (the ``Guppies''), each genial episode making its small, wholesome point via demonstration: the toddler who naps in the morning is the only one who's wide awake at lunchtime; an inchworm is fun to hold, but will be happiest outside. Read full book review >