Search Results: "Sherban Young"


BOOK REVIEW

Fleeting Promise by Sherban Young
Released: July 27, 2015

"Another delectable entry in a brilliant series."
In Young's (Fleeting Chance, 2014, etc.) fifth series installment, semiretired private detective Enescu Fleet and his friends find themselves in a real pickle when they attend a restaurant opening and discover that murder's on the menu.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FLEETING GLANCE  by Sherban Young
Released: Nov. 1, 2012

"A smart, laugh-out-loud murder-mystery romp."
Enigmatic Romanian master detective Enescu Fleet returns for another tangled tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FLEETING CHANCE by Sherban Young
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 25, 2014

"A series that seemingly couldn't get any better goes a little deeper; with Young at the helm, readers can't lose."
Fleet and friends take to the sea to solve a maritime murder in Young's (Fleeting Note, 2013, etc.) fourth entry in his one-of-a-kind comic mystery series. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FLEETING NOTE by Sherban Young
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: July 9, 2013

"Young has done it again with his unique blend of lighthearted mystery and quick-witted characters."
What begins as an evening out for semiretired private investigator Enescu Fleet at the Pendleton Institute of Music ends on a sour note when the body of a music critic crashes the party in Young's (Fleeting Glance, 2012, etc.) third comic mystery in the series. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FLEETING MEMORY by Sherban Young
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: July 20, 2011

"An utterly winning, deceptively smart collection of mishaps, plot twists and grinning one-liners."
A man with no memory stumbles into his own shaggy dog story. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

A MIGHTY IMAGINATION
by Julie Danielson

Barbara DaCosta and Ed Young aren’t new to collaboration. In 2012, she wrote and he illustrated Nighttime Ninja, her debut picture book. Mighty Moby, on shelves in early August, is their second collaboration, and it came to exist in a way not typical for most picture books, what the author calls “an unusual method” and “backward.”

Evidently, Ed Young ...


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BOOK REVIEW

DON'T EAT THE BABY by Amy Young
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 16, 2013

"Who would have thought that threatened cannibalism could yield such a sweet and original little read in a market glutted with new-sibling stories? (Picture book. 3-7)"
They'll eat him up they love him so. Or so this new big brother fears. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 2008

"Specific enough to hold interest, yet universal enough to appeal to those from almost all walks of life, this is the perfect springboard for family reminiscences. (Picture book. 2-6)"
Told in an irrepressible toddler's voice, this is stream of consciousness at its best. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BELINDA THE BALLERINA by Amy Young
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2003

"In a rather crowded corps de ballet of recent dance titles for children, Belinda stands out for more than her big feet. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Face the facts, Belinda has a problem, in fact, "two big problems: her left foot and her right foot." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I, DOKO by Ed Young
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 2004

"The dynamic, jewel-toned pastel, collage and gouache illustrations, bordered and flecked with gold give dignity, richness and power to a traditional Asian tale that embodies both the Golden Rule and respect for the elderly. (Picture book. 5-8)"
The epigraph from Kung Fu Tze—"What one wishes not upon oneself, one burdens not upon another"—aptly summarizes this simple parable set in Nepal. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SEVEN BLIND MICE by Ed Young
ANIMALS
Released: April 29, 1992

"Exquisitely crafted: a simple, gracefully honed text, an appealing story, real but unobtrusive values and levels of meaning, and outstanding illustrations and design—all add up to a perfect book. (Picture book. 3+)"
A many-talented illustrator (Lon Po Po, 1989, Caldecott Medal) uses a new medium—collage—in an innovative reworking of ``The Blind Men and the Elephant,'' with splendid results: a book that casually rehearses the days of the week, numbers (ordinal and cardinal), and colors while memorably explicating and extending the theme: ``Knowing in part may make a fine tale, but wisdom comes from seeing the whole.'' The mice (first seen as an intriguing row of bright tails on the elegantly spare black title spread) are the colors of the rainbow plus white; they, the white text, and the parts of the elephant (as they really are and as the mice imagine them) are superimposed on a dramatic black ground. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CAT AND RAT by Ed Young
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"Inclusion of a page of horoscopes along with the Gregorian equivalents to the animals' years will intrigue readers, but the story may not keep them involved to the end. (Picture book/folklore. 4-8)"
According to the notes at the beginning of the book, when the Chinese calendar was created, the animals ran a race, and the 12 who came in first had a year named after them. Read full book review >