Search Results: "Shirley Isherwood"


BOOK REVIEW

SOMETHING FOR JAMES by Shirley Isherwood
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 1996

"Sweet suspense—even sweeter reassurance. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A mysterious, shy creature arrives in a brown paper bag on toddler James's doorstep. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BAND OVER THE HILL by Shirley Isherwood
ANIMALS
Released: Nov. 1, 1997

"Isherwood's very forced, prolonged plot has an arbitrary feel, and while the child's preoccupation with his buttons is realistic, the father's single-minded pursuit, at his son's expense, appears unreasonable, and very nearly mean. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Mr. Manders and Edward James, a pair of bears who are father and son, have always wanted to be in a marching band. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DIARIES by Christopher Isherwood
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 6, 1997

"Maundering, prolix, altogether daunting."
Mixing mournful self-interrogation about sex, art, and politics; less than lucid delvings into spiritual matters; and wry chatter about acquaintances both obscure and celebrated, Isherwood's voluminous diaries provide rather too wide a window onto the eminent novelist and memoirist's foibles. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A SINGLE MAN by Christopher Isherwood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 25, 1964

"Some will read about it with discomfiture."
A Single Man, like its forerunner Down There on a Visit, is perhaps not best read as a novel and is just hazily fictional. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LIBERATION by Christopher Isherwood
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 6, 2012

"Isherwood was unquestionably a fascinating man. True fans of his work as well as gossip lovers will no doubt read all three volumes of his diaries. For the rest of us, a simple biography should be sufficient."
Final volume of the meticulously detailed diaries of the acclaimed author of Goodbye to Berlin (1939) and other celebrated works. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JACOB'S HANDS by Aldous Huxley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 8, 1998

"A minor, if intriguing, footnote to two impressive careers."
A literary curiosity. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ELLA’S BIG CHANCE by Shirley Hughes
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2004

"Hughes has added shimmer to her familiar pen-and-gouache style and elegantly fashioned a delightful, revisionist fairy tale. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Few illustrators could so stylishly dress up the tale of Cinderella with the dash and glitter of the roaring '20s as Hughes has done here with aplomb. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BIG ALFIE OUT OF DOORS STORYBOOK by Shirley Hughes
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 16, 1992

"Mom'' and other needless Americanizations, undermining the splendidly evoked British setting. (Young reader/Picture book. 3-8)"
Four longish stories and as many pleasant poems about happy, wholesome experiences for Alfie and his little sister: setting up shop on a cardboard box; camping out with Dad in a real tent near Grandma's (a huge pig provides an amusing midnight disturbance, just scary enough); adopting a rock (``Bonting'') that Alfie invests with so much personality that losing ``him'' at the beach is truly sad (he's found, in the end). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ALFIE'S 1-2-3 by Shirley Hughes
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 31, 2000

"Fans of Alfie will savor this newest adventure while the uninitiated will quickly discover why this series has such enduring popularity with children and adults alike. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Alfie and his little sister Annie Rose are back, this time introducing the numbers one through ten in a playful approach to counting. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STORIES BY FIRELIGHT by Shirley Hughes
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"As welcome as a cozy blaze on a raw winter day. (Picture book/Young reader. 4-10)"
Another beguiling thematic collection: poems; stories— including a story-within-a-story in which a child convalescing with her mother's artist friend Morag explores a rocky coast, gets on quietly with her own drawing while Morag works, and enjoys Morag's tale of a selkie wife; a wordless ``Midwinter Night's Dream'' in which a young somnambulist sees all kinds of benign fantastical creatures lurking around his home; three fine Christmas entries, notably a British barmaid's harried response to ``A couple requiring a meal and a bed'' (``It's the wrong time of year, as I've already said;/I'd help if I could, with her in that state,/But I'm rushed off my feet and we're so understaffed...''). Read full book review >