Search Results: "Sibylle von Olfers"


BOOK REVIEW

THE STORY OF KING LION by Sibylle von Olfers
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 1, 2013

"Fun as a novelty piece, but unlikely to engage too many 21st-century readers. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A 1912 German classic is reprinted in English for the first time in its 101-year-old history. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE STORY OF THE SNOW CHILDREN by Sibylle von Olfers
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 2013

"An old-fashioned delight for new children. (Picture book. 4-7)"
A simple but richly imaginative tale in a tiny book with exquisite illustrations, translated from a 1905 German book. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PRICKLY JENNY by Sibylle Delacroix
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 15, 2015

"With its small trim size, this empathetic offering might be just the thing for little ones to take off by themselves when they're feeling prickly. (Picture book. 3-7)"
A girl is in low spirits all day. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DARK WATERS by Sibylle Barrasso
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Aug. 20, 2008

"A pretty good mystery marred by some pretty awful chick lit."
Boston shamus Macy Adams debuts in the case of the wronged little woman. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EVA’S COUSIN by Sibylle Knauss
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"An earnest if also lethargic footnote to a footnote of history. (This is the first of Knauss's five novels to be translated into English.)"
Talk about 15 minutes of celebrity: here's a novel based on German dramaturgy professor Knauss's interviews with Gertrude Weisker, who spent the last several months of WWII with her cousin Eva Braun at Hitler's mountain retreat. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A GIFT FOR THE CHRIST CHILD by Tina Jahnert
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2004

"The illustrations of curly-haired Miriam help bring her character to life: a barefooted little girl with a lamb, a doll, and a blanket, and a wish to be important to her family. (Picture book. 3-7)"
The well-worn theme of bringing gifts for the baby Jesus receives a new twist in this gentle Christmas story, because the giver of this gift is a little girl named Miriam. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

YOU KNOW YOU LOVE ME by Cecily von Ziegesar
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"Getting it all sorted out is the fun of it, and like its predecessor, it's a highly enjoyable speedboat of a read, zipping along at lightning speed, leaving adolescent angst, wounded egos, and Manolo Blahnik mules in its wake. (Fiction. YA)"
Continuing her soap opera saga where Gossip Girl (p. 580) left off, von Ziegesar again has her mostly rich, private-school crew of privileged Manhattan teenagers partying at elegant eateries, drinking booze, and shopping at high-end stores, but also thinking about college. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GOSSIP GIRL by Cecily von Ziegesar
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: April 1, 2001

"That caveat aside, girls should find this lightweight novel spicy, entertaining, and their own trashy fun. (Fiction. YA)"
Deliciously catty and immediately engrossing, this is the ultimate beach read for teenage girls, offering them a titillating peek into the heady world of Manhattan's well-heeled teens, private-school kids who "have unlimited access to money and booze," and—since their prominent self-involved parents are terribly busy and largely disinterested—"tons of privacy" as well. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Nov. 1, 2012

"A well-researched historical account."
The biography of a German spymaster in Mexico during the tumultuous early 1900s. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VENUSIA by Mark von Schlegell
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Oct. 1, 2005

"A shaky start to an already threatened series that can only improve."
Narcotic flowers keep the masses placated in a decaying, dystopian, extraterrestrial colony in this ambitious but marginal sci-fi fantasy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 22, 1995

"A powerful argument that we should all avoid sloganeering about the death penalty and think more carefully about justice. (8 pages b&w photos, not seen) (Author tour)"
Washington Post reporter Drehle (formerly of the Miami Herald) crafts a gripping narrative traversing the world of the death penalty. ``Twenty men have been sentenced to die under Florida's modern death penalty laws for every one who has been executed,'' he writes. ``Nothing but chance has separated those who live from those who died.'' Though he reviews (and refutes) the standard prodeath penalty arguments of deterrence and retribution, Drehle's concern is with the flawed system in practice. Read full book review >