Search Results: "Silvana De Mari"


BOOK REVIEW

THE LAST DRAGON by Silvana De Mari
FANTASY
Released: Oct. 1, 2006

"Readers are left assured that kindness and hope will prevail, however tenuously, over anger and fear. (Fantasy. 10+)"
In the first section of this wise, warmhearted fairytale, the elf Yorsh is only a sweetly naïve child; but as the last of his kind, he accepts his destined burden to return summer to a world of endless rain and famine. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 2004

From Italy, a gently whimsical tale of transformation and survival. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 2, 1998

"A worthwhile look at some unexpected aspects of gender and the AIDS epidemic that should prompt other, more comprehensive and neutral studies of Latin American sexuality."
Paternostro, a fellow at the World Policy Institute and a journalist whose work has been featured in the Washington Post and various other publications, travels throughout Latin America to research this arresting but unpolished book on gender, sex, and AIDS. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I LIVE IN TOKYO by Mari Takabayashi
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"A painted map of Japan provides a frame of reference, and the final page includes pronunciations for the months, the numbers from one to twelve, and a few Japanese words and phrases. (Picture book/nonfiction. 4-8)"
Here is a charming—and accurate—introduction to Tokyo as seen through the eyes of a fictional seven-year-old girl. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 4, 2007

"A conflicted memoir of bodegas, bullets and a country tearing itself apart from within."
A Colombian-born journalist returns to her homeland in an attempt to reconcile her own past and her country's chaotic present. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GOLDEN GIRL by Mari Mancusi
CHILDREN'S
Released: Dec. 15, 2015

"Mancusi's engrossing tale provides a gripping glimpse at competitive snowboarding and a penetrating look at friendships within that context. (Fiction. 11-14)"
With a dad who is a former Winter X Games athlete and an impressive achievement record of her own, Lexi seems poised for the Olympics when a devastating snowboarding accident occurs. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CARRETA DE LA MUERTE by Mari Ulmer
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: March 1, 2001

"The highlight may be the appended Spanish-to-English glossary."
Taos, New Mexico, gearing up for the revelry of Las Fiestas, suddenly has more con artists and killers than tourists. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I LIVE IN BROOKLYN by Mari Takabayashi
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 22, 2004

"I-like-to-do-with-my-family genre, this is fine, but it doesn't look like Brooklyn at all. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Takabayashi's latest starts out promisingly. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SMOKED by Mari Mancusi
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"Where there's smoke, there's fire. And dragons. And the end of the world. (Fantasy. 14 & up)"
No one is immune to sacrifice and revenge, and sometimes even a vegetarian dragon can have a taste for blood. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PRINCESSES, INC.  by Mari Mancusi
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 18, 2017

"Lightweight, disposable fun. (Fiction. 9-12)"
News that YouTube star and fan-fiction hero Collin Prince will be a special guest at a comic convention sends Hailey, 13, and her three besties scrambling to finance a trip to Comicpalooza. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SUMMONS OF LOVE by Mari Ruti
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 1, 2011

"A psychological look at love relationships and their pragmatic benefits that cleverly blends scientific language and romantic concepts."
Canadian professor Ruti has love all figured out and explains why it's worth the trouble. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

MORE THAN ONE KIND OF MIRROR
by Julie Danielson

It’s rare to see picture books that address squalor or anything just short of it. One could argue that children from families with significant economic disadvantages would prefer to read books of escapism. Yet at the same time, as has been addressed and discussed so often in the field of children’s literature, particularly in the past several years, those same ...


Read the full post >