Search Results: "Square Igloo"


BOOK REVIEW

ZOE'S GREEN PLANET by Nathalie Tousnakhoff
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 28, 2013

"A simple story about planet-crossed friendship but one in which the eye-catching artwork both accounts for and counteracts much of the colorful charm. (iPad storybook app. 3-8)"
Two little girls from planets which are different in only one big way become friends in this visually striking app. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BLUE BERNARD by Nathalie Tousnakhoff
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 19, 2013

"Bernard's story alone is lovely to look at with too few shades between its primary hues. (iPad storybook app. 4-8)"
The second in an app series called Colorful World, this follow-up to Zoe's Green Planet (2013) follows Bernard, who is "blue from head to toe" on an all-pink planet. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SCOTT'S SUBMARINE by Square Igloo
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 7, 2011

"Despite minor flubs in the English translation ('The crab is a crustacea [sic] with 10 legs'), this is a voyage worth taking. (iPad storybook app. 4-7)"
Unusual interactive features and visual effects give this undersea jaunt a glossy digital sheen. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BYRD & IGLOO by Samantha Seiple
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 24, 2013

"Man and dog versus nature is a good read, but this one needs better navigation. (index, not seen) (Nonfiction. 8-12)"
Framing an explorer's expeditions from the viewpoint of a sidekick pet can engage readers, so long as the animal is not overly humanized. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BUILDING AN IGLOO by Ulli Steltzer
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"Despite that, Steltzer's text, photographs, and subject compel the imagination. (Picture book/nonfiction. 3-8)"
With only a saw and a knife for tools, Tookillkee and his son Jopee build an igloo. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HAUNTED IGLOO by Bonnie Turner
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"Still, Jean-Paul's successful rites of passage may strike a response in readers who enjoyed Gardiner's Stone Fox (1980), or may lead them into Paulsen's Dogsong (1985) and Woodsong (1990). (Fiction. 8-12)"
Small for his age and lame, Jean-Paul, ten, is almost overwhelmed by life in the remote Alaskan wilderness where his father has been working for two years. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TACKY AND THE HAUNTED IGLOO by Helen Lester
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 21, 2015

"Halloween has not been as shivery, silly, and satisfying as in this polar romp. (Picture book. 4-8)"
While his friends busy themselves getting the igloo ready for Halloween, Tacky the Penguin is less than helpful. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAN SQUARE by Curtis Hibbler
Released: July 25, 2014

"A no-frills primer aimed squarely at a socially conservative Christian readership."
A concise guide for women who want to understand their men. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HARVARD SQUARE by André Aciman
Released: April 8, 2013

"A rather modest addition to immigrant experience literature."
Two immigrant outsiders hang out in cafes near Harvard. One vents, the other listens, in this third novel from the Egyptian-born Aciman (Eight White Nights, 2010, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 3, 2012

"A personal account that will be appreciated by those looking to move beyond the day's headlines, from one who wrote some of the stories published under those headlines."
A debut journalistic memoir by Cairo-based reporter Khalil, who covered the rise and fall of Hosni Mubarak's dictatorship. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ABC BOOKS
Released: Oct. 1, 2008

"A worthy companion to his previous offerings. (Pop-up/picture book. 6 & up)"
Carter again challenges readers to make their way through a series of three-dimensional homages to modern art, this time chasing the yellow square that appears in each (600 Black Spots, 2007, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NINTH SQUARE by Gorman Bechard
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

"Bechard (Good Neighbors, 1998, etc.) laces his frantic plot with satisfyingly obvious targets and suitably moody atmospherics, even though many of the key figures in his morality play remain too shadowy to spring to very convincing life."
The homicide at the Elm City Motor Lodge looks straightforward enough: A prostitute's obviously gone berserk and stabbed her client to death. Read full book review >