Search Results: "Stanley Bing"


BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 2003

"By the end, readers may feel they are suffocating in lint, but Bing would advise them to never let their lips—or their smile—drop below the ever-roiling surface."
Rules and tools for the business road, sold amusingly but on a depressing foundation of inanity, by novelist (You Look Nice Today, p. 869, etc.) and CBS executive Bing, a.k.a. Gil Schwartz in his everyday corporate pajamas. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LLOYD: WHAT HAPPENED by Stanley Bing
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 15, 1998

"A scathingly snide, occasionally grating send-up of American business that's rendered with expertise, affection, and flashes of satiric brilliance by one who's lived it. (Author tour)"
Gassy, deadpan first novel, a tour de farce that both reviles and celebrates the pretentious, treacherous, and luxurious world of corporate middle management, revealed here by Fortune magazine's business columnist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

YOU LOOK NICE TODAY by Stanley Bing
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2003

"While its ending is foreordained (and a bit pat), the story succeeds marvelously in its seasoned appreciation of the many pleasures—and perils—of executive life. (See the July 15 issue of Kirkus for The Big Bing.)"
Wry account of a sexual harassment lawsuit that's really a captivating, suspenseful love letter to American middle management, from Fortune columnist Bing, who (as CBS executive Gil Schwartz) has lived it. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CURRICULUM by Stanley Bing
NON-FICTION
Released: April 15, 2014

"Humorous, mostly informative guidance to the world of the 'business arts.'"
More than a full semester's worth of advice on being successful in business. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 15, 2006

"A humorous executive summary of Edward Gibbon, part of a series on various forms of enterprise for MBA types."
In a crafty, comic case study, Bing (nom de guerre of a mid-level suit working at a conglomerate) imagines Imperial Rome as a commercial operation. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STANLEY AT SCHOOL by Linda Bailey
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2015

"Here's hoping readers feel the same way about school as Stanley does; even if they don't, though, they are sure to laugh at the dogs' adventures. Where will they end up next? (Picture book. 4-8)"
Stanley's curiosity this time leads him to find out what all the kids do in school every day. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BINGSOP'S FABLES by Stanley Bing
NON-FICTION
Released: April 26, 2011

"Deceptively simple bedtime stories for adults."
Biting wisdom of the corporate world conveyed through a series of clever moral tales and anthropomorphic illustrations. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STANLEY THE FARMER by William Bee
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2015

"Steady and bright, this will appeal to toddlers looking for comfort, not thrills. (Picture book. 2-4)"
A cartoonlike hamster named Stanley and two other small mammals demonstrate the steps used to plant, maintain and harvest wheat at a typical commercial farm. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STANLEY THE BUILDER by William Bee
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2014

"Nonetheless, little listeners are sure to come back to Stanley over and over, as he explores jobs and uses equipment sure to pique their interest. (Picture book. 2-6)"
In Bee's new series, Stanley the hamster explores jobs. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STANLEY, CALIFORNIA by Sheila Evans
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2003

"Arlene might find a sense of home again, but she does it without much feeling of resolution."
Evans's second (after Maggie's Rags, not reviewed) is a bit like Cheever's story "The Swimmer," with less of the emotional trauma and essential mystery. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BING CROSBY'S LAST SONG by Lester Goran
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 12, 1998

"An appropriately bittersweet evocation of a largely vanished world, distinguished by its ripe, vigorous language and by a moving portrait of a troubled, decent man."
"It's a heavy millstone," the protagonist of this sad, salty novel reflects, "to be the son of a good father." Read full book review >