Search Results: "Stanley Elkin"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 19, 1973

"These are darkly hilarious tales about the encounter with the black void: a highly crafted intelligent book for intelligent, verbally attuned readers for whom the baroque is but a heightened way of approaching reality."
Three novellas by the marvelous black-comic author of Boswell, The Dick Gibson Show, and Criers and Kibitzers, Kibitzers and Criers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LIVING END by Stanley Elkin
Released: June 12, 1979

"Spotty, minor work, perhaps—but flash after flash of real brilliance."
God is a stand-up comic. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MACGUFFIN by Stanley Elkin
Released: March 1, 1991

"Teeming with ideas and allusions, but cumulatively lifeless."
When the man in charge begins to feel out of control, Elkin (The Rabbi of Lud, 1987) has a situation tailormade for displaying his virtuosity—but this time around the humor, plot, and theme seem as tired and over the hill as the hero. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 1, 1980

"But, if only for that superb Evanier story, it's a valuable item."
Stanley Elkin is this year's guest editor for the Best Stories—and, not surprisingly, the kinds of stories he likes are the kind he writes: longish, comically operatic, frequently about Jews or the momentarily possessed. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GEORGE MILLS by Stanley Elkin
Released: Oct. 25, 1982

"So, though this 488-page novel is a leaky collection of parts rather than one whole strong book (Elkin is a short-form writer no matter how he's packaged), connoisseurs of comic fiction will consider it required reading: a brilliant set of flags blowing the irrepressible wind of Elkin's fierce, bold comedy."
George Mills, who lives in St. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A BAD MAN by Stanley Elkin
Released: Oct. 13, 1967

"Feldman represents not a man, but a good short story gone bad at novel length."
Elkin, whose Boswell (1964) heralded a major talent, continues to dazzle; he's got the wit, he's got the words, but he still lacks a story capable of attracting and holding a large audience. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EARLY ELKIN by Stanley Elkin
Released: July 1, 1985

"After all, there's life in this unpretentious little volume, a thread of melancholy woven into the drollery, and a few pieces of early Elkin for those who want to see what they're like, or to make their collection complete."
As the title suggests, this is a small handful of early pieces by Elkin (three short stories and a brief memoir-essay), including his very first published story, "A Sound of Distant Thunder," which appeared originally in Epoch magazine. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MRS. TED BLISS by Stanley Elkin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 7, 1995

"A fiendish and, by end, thoroughly engrossing life study."
An extremely vexing if entertaining novel about an 80-year-old Jewish widow, by the late master of obsessive dark humor (Van Gogh's Room at Aries, 1993, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DICK GIBSON SHOW by Stanley Elkin
Released: Feb. 19, 1970

"Like Boswell, like The Bad Man, it's a showcase presentation and something of an apocalyptic hype, more to be admired than actively enjoyed."
The Dick Gibson Show is a talk show with a very loud speaker, an obsessed, obliterating performance as the turntable turns and turns and attempts to fill the void. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 11, 1965

"Watch Elkin."
Our most important novelists were and are important for their short stories, too-Fitzgerald, Faulkner, Hemingway, O'Hara, et al. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STORIES FROM THE SIXTIES by Stanley Elkin
Released: June 4, 1971

"Younger talents such as Leonard Michaels, Barton Midwood and Robert Coover are represented along with two older innovators — John Barth and Tillie Olsen — and other up and comers."
Mr. Elkin's brief preface doesn't leave much maneuvering room, but he does manage a quick limn of the genre, based let's say on the twin prongs of inspiration ("the brain's bum's rush") and a "learned" backlog of fictional assumptions. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PIECES OF SOAP by Stanley Elkin
Released: Feb. 1, 1992

"Bed-table sedative that amuses with hairpin turns and arabesques."
Twenty-nine high-wire acts that prove Elkin (The MacGuffin, 1991; The Rabbi of Lud, 1987, etc.) one of our zaniest acrobats of the acerb since Perelman. Read full book review >