Search Results: "Stefan Schmitz"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 2, 2005

"<\b>Candid, personal, laced with thoroughly haunting imagery."
Memoirs from the Eastern Front by an ordinary Wehrmacht soldier with an extraordinary grasp the horrors of war. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PAPER LANTERNS by Stefan Czernecki
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

"Enlightening. (Picture book. 3-8)"
Those time-tested attributes of a good student—listen quietly, watch carefully, practice persistently—get unforced cultivation in this tale, but it's the lanterns that steal the show. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2008

"Meeting a real need, this is an excellent choice for the preschool set. (Picture book. 3-5)"
A simple, clearly worded text about divorce for the youngest children, this will help parents hammer home the twin messages that it is not the child's fault and that the child is loved very much by each parent, no matter what happens. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GROUCHO by Stefan Kanfer
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 25, 2000

"A highly competent but finally rather troubling work."
As a historian of the Borscht Belt and of animated film (Serious Business, 1997), Kanfer would seem to be a good match for the verbally adroit Marx. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: July 10, 2001

"Despite an occasional overload of detail, this is a provocative look at the world of games and the way the mind works with words."
From Wall Street Journal sports reporter and NPR commentator Fatsis (Wild and Outside, 1998), a comprehensive guide to the world of competitive Scrabble. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JUSTIFYING GENOCIDE by Stefan Ihrig
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 4, 2016

"A groundbreaking academic study that shows how Germany derived from the Armenian genocide 'a plethora of recipes' to address its own ethnic problems."
This scholarly study reveals how the Germans "received" the events of the Armenian genocide—and later whitewashed and even found motivation from it. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BAYAMUS and CARDINAL PôLéTöO by Stefan Themerson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1997

"Both stories are dense, demanding, hilarious, and richly enjoyable."
Bayamus and Cardinal PîlÑtÅo ($15.95 paperback original; Apr. 1, 1997; 240 pp.; 1-878972-21-9): Two cryptic and amusing novellas from a late (191088) Polish master of the avant-garde. ``Bayamus'' is a language-drunk romp that wryly explores the transformative effect on reality produced by the practice of ``semantic poetry'' (``ways of making familiar words look as if they were not familiar'') and features such arresting characters as silent-filmmaker Karl Mayer; a Chinese giant; and a ``Homo Triped,'' who is born a boy and becomes a girl. ``The Life of Cardinal PîlÑtÅo'' deliciously revises Plato in a lively fantasy about a truculent cleric determined to rid the world of poets, and hence of heresy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 26, 2006

"Yiddish theater for beginners."
Biographer and cultural historian Kanfer (Ball of Fire, 2003, etc.) provides a workmanlike chronicle of the populist drama that flourished in the US as long as the Jewish masses kept one foot in the Old World, one in the New. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 7, 2014

"Tougher-minded readers will prefer Steven Pinker's The Better Angels of Our Nature (2011) and even Prince Kropotkin himself."
A middling look at some of the better angels of our nature by German science writer Klein (Leonardo's Legacy: How Da Vinci Reimagined the World, 2010, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 15, 2003

"Entertaining and thoughtful observations bring The Redhead into sharp focus. (16-page photo insert, 15 additional photos in text)"
Canny critic and cultural historian Kanfer (Serious Business, 1998, etc.) brings a bemused attitude and a keen knowledge of show business to a tale that's becoming as familiar as an I Love Lucy rerun. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DARKEST DESIRE by Anthony Schmitz
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Nov. 26, 1998

"An artful, ironic updating of venerable material, done with zest and great originality."
A mordantly witty, slyly intelligent take on the Brothers Grimm and their folktales, as seen from the viewpoint of a man-eating (or, more precisely, child-eating) wolf that they attempt to subdue. Read full book review >