Search Results: "Stella Gurney"


BOOK REVIEW

PUSS IN BOOTS by Gerald Kelley
ADVENTURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2011

"This ageless trickster tale has a nicely subversive message, but this rendition lacks the panache to carry it off. (Pop-up fairy tale. 8-10)"
A wooden retelling of Perrault's classic tale, with underwhelming movable parts. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DINOTOPIA by James Gurney
ADVENTURE
Released: Oct. 8, 1992

"More wistful fancy than a new vision of a cure for humanity's ills, but some adults—and children—will love it dearly. (Fiction. 8+)"
A sweet, visually attractive utopian fantasy about an island where humans and dinosaurs—not to mention mammoths, flying reptiles, and exotic plants—live together in peace. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JUST LIKE US by David Gurney
Released: Aug. 29, 2012

"Compelling religious reading on its own, but also enhances its source material."
Gurney's devotional looks at the life of Jesus through the eyes of various biblical figures. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 1997

"Beyond the harrowing adventures one would expect to read about in any narrative of Antarctic discovery, Gurney's articulate story is a welcome portrait of an age driven by great mysteries and simpler technologies than those of today. (drawings, maps, not seen)"
In this comprehensive account—written with sufficient wit and historical asides to offset the tedium of names, dates, and geographic minutiae—yacht designer and photographer Gurney shows how the discovery of the icebound continent became one of the great goals of explorers beginning in the late 17th century. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AT RISK by Stella Rimington
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Jan. 13, 2005

"New wine, expertly crafted, in old bottles."
Does the post-9/11 world have room for espionage fiction? First-novelist Rimington, the former Director General of Britain's MI5, certainly thinks so. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JIMMY BENCH-PRESS by Charlie Stella
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Dec. 1, 2002

"Almost redeeming."
Born Jimmy Mangino, he's known these days, some 35 years later, as Jimmy Bench-Press, marking the time he lifted 402 pounds while marking time in the slammer. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KISS THEM GOODBYE by Stella Cameron
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2003

"Incoherent plot, wooden dialogue, clumsy prose: in a word, abysmal. Cameron should be ashamed."
More sex and murder and boudin sausage, from Cameron (Key West, 1999, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GENEVA TRAP by Stella Rimington
Released: Oct. 2, 2012

"Considering the magnitude of the threat and the echoes of From Russia with Love and Diamonds Are Forever (the film, not the book), everything gets wrapped up suspiciously neatly, even though, as Liz sagely remarks, 'I wonder if we'll ever know what this was really all about.'"
Someone's threatening the security of the U.S. drone program, and according to MI5's best information, it seems to be a combination of—wait for it—the Russians, the North Koreans and the South Koreans. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A MARKED MAN by Stella Cameron
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2006

"Cameron still has the heart of a romance writer, and readers are left in no doubt that Annie and Max will end well, no matter how many sexually exhausted bodies and half-developed plot lines float away down the bayou."
A handsome surgeon, a woman with a past and another predictable yawn from romantic-suspense-churner Cameron. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PRAY AND DIE by Stella Whitelaw
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Dec. 1, 2000

"Ingenious plotting and crisp dialogue rescue this oversentimental heroine's debut from the perils of melodrama."
Whitelaw, whose most recent mysteries have featured cats in starring roles, launches her new, all-too-human heroine with this entry in the plucky-single-woman-in-danger genre. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 2000

"A low-calorie taste of a very rich city."
New York journalist Dong offers an engaging but rather lightweight portrayal of the Chinese (and—arguably—European) city of Shanghai, from its days as an opium port in 1842 to the fall of the city to the Communists in 1949. Read full book review >