Search Results: "Stephan Pastis"


BOOK REVIEW

TIMMY FAILURE by Stephan Pastis
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 25, 2014

"A loonily intellectual alternative to that wimpy kid. (Comic mystery. 8-12)"
If Inspector Clouseau were in grade school, he'd be Timmy Failure. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TIMMY FAILURE by Stephan Pastis
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 28, 2014

"Timmy Failure is a classic antihero: Some readers will be drawn to the book because of him; others will be drawn to it in spite of him. (Comic mystery. 8-12)"
This is a book about very nice people. None of them is Timmy Failure. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TIMMY FAILURE by Stephan Pastis
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 26, 2013

"Timmy may not be one of the great children's-book characters, but he has greatness in him. Just like all of us. (Comic mystery. 8-12)"
The great children's-book characters can get on your nerves. Eloise is a little spoiled. The Cat in the Hat refuses to listen to anyone else. Timmy Failure would be easy to actually hate. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BOOK YOU'RE NOT SUPPOSED TO HAVE by Stephan Pastis
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 27, 2016

"Wittier than the Wimpy Kid and with a movie in the offing, the series can only gain fans. (Graphic/mystery hybrid. 7-12)"
Who could ban the world's greatest detective from detecting? In a word: mom. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CAT STOLE MY PANTS by Stephan Pastis
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 25, 2017

"Fans will be satisfied and look expectantly for Book 7. (Graphic/mystery hybrid. 7-11)"
Timmy Failure, world-class detective, is on the case even when on vacation. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SANITIZED FOR YOUR PROTECTION by Stephan Pastis
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 6, 2015

"Abundantly illustrated fun for readers who are tired of the Wimpy Kid. (Graphic/fiction hybrid. 8-12)"
Detective Timmy Failure is on the case…probably not a good thing for anyone involved. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOTEL PASTIS by Peter Mayle
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 8, 1993

"A cedar box of Havana Churchills, a pint of white diamonds— the gift novel par excellence, its smart dialogue at full glitter throughout. (First printing of 100,000 is just frog jelly before the tads pop.)"
Consumer glories rendered by a master (the velvety Acquired Tastes, 1992) in a richly amusing first novel set in London and Provence, even more stylish than Mayle's travel hits (Toujours Provence, 1991, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DROWNING OF STEPHAN JONES by Bette Greene
FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1991

"A story with a significant theme, but without the artistic distinction of the author's early books. (Fiction. 14+)"
A noted author (Summer of My German Soldier, 1973) depicts the tragic effects of homophobia, with results that are more polemical than literary. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAMASAURUS by Stephan Lomp
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 8, 2016

"Like P.D. Eastman's 1960 classic Are You My Mother? for the dino set, though it lacks the facts (and even the dinosaur names!) presented elsewhere, as in Shari Halpern's Dinosaur Parade (2014). (Picture book. 3-5)"
A small dinosaur needs help from other dino babies when he slides off his mother's back and can't find her again. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 3, 2010

"A solid journalistic exposé."
Philadelphia Inquirer journalist Salisbury explores the reprisals against Muslim communities in Philadelphia and beyond since the beginning of the War on Terror. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LAST GIRL by Stephan Collishaw
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2003

"Post-Soviet absurdity and a unflinching history rendered in effective prose."
Noirish mystery of a lost manuscript in a post-Soviet Lithuania, a country where poetry once made a difference. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GOING POSTAL by Stephan Jaramillo
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 27, 1997

"Jokes about Charles Manson and designer coffee—this pointless debut appeals to the lowest common denominator of slacker chic, itself a rather passÇ phenomenon."
The title is the only funny thing about this fictional memoir of a mailman's son, a 27-year-old slacker who's haunted by ``the Evil Seed of Postal Hate.'' His juvenile rants and violent fantasies add to the sense that he's really just slumming in Bukowski-land. Read full book review >