Search Results: "Stephane Gerson"


BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 30, 2012

"Gerson deftly explains the lure of Nostradamus, but no one can possibly translate his verses. Just like poetry, only the author knows what he meant."
Cultural historian Gerson (History/New York Univ.; The Pride of Place: Local Memories and Political Culture in Modern France, 2003, etc.) shares his vast knowledge of and fascination with the legendary seer. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"The essays are of varying quality, some quite sketchy in their scope, but overall a devastating and important book, already hailed in Europe, and the more harrowing for its sobriety. (78 photos, 6 maps)"
A unique attempt by French historians—as important in its way as the works of Solzhenitsyn—to chronicle the crimes of communism wherever it has attained power in the world. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ESSENTIAL NEOCONSERVATIVE READER by Mark Gerson
NON-FICTION
Released: July 1, 1996

"Uncommonly sensible and civil discourses from a bridge group whose ideas are fast entering the mainstream, if not the realm of conventional wisdom."
An impressive sampler of improbably influential essays that in the aggregate suggest neoconservatism is more a sensibility than a coherent political doctrine. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 2, 2013

"Not as groundbreaking as the author imagines, but a solid retelling of an always-interesting tale of the first great urban-planning achievement."
A mildly revisionist history that gives principal credit for the modernization of Paris to the monarch rather than the prefect. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: July 28, 1993

"In spite of the limited and slanted population sampling: a persuasively argued, sympathetic contribution to the growing literature of male liberation."
In a vivid, precise, but limited study, Gerson (Sociology/ N.Y.U.) extends to men the problems she explored in Hard Choices (1985), a study of women's dilemmas with family and career. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DISASTER FALLS by Stéphane Gerson
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 24, 2017

"An unflinchingly honest, moving memoir of loss and recovery."
How the author and his family overcame the loss of a child. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 17, 1991

"Loosely joined, dulled by a siege mentality, and overstuffed with excerpts from UN meetings—but nevertheless an informed view of the neoconservative mind-set in American diplomatic circles during Reagan's first term."
A firsthand account of the perils of American diplomacy at the UN during Jeane Kirkpatrick's tenure, written from Gerson's position as her expert in international law. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 7, 1997

"Engaging anecdotes of a school year, leading to a thoughtful exploration of what urban and suburban cultures can learn from each other."
The first-person account of a neophyte history teacher in an inner-city high school: White, Republican, Ivy League, he epitomizes The Man to his mostly black and Hispanic students. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DEATHWATCH '39 by Jack Gerson
Released: Jan. 9, 1990

Ernest Lohmann, the honorable ex-Berlin Police Inspector who escaped to England one step ahead of the Gestapo (Death's Head Berlin and Death Squad London), is now asked by Whitehall to "babysit" Capt. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHY THE SKY IS FAR AWAY by Mary-Joan Gerson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"The story may be centuries old, but it teaches a timely lesson and is retold in a lively, nonpreachy way. (Folklore/Picture book. 6-8)"
Once the sky was so close that people could reach up and break off pieces of it to eat, but they wasted so much that the sky grew angry. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MY PEAR by Stephane  Kiehl
illustrated by Stephane Kiehl, developed by e-Toiles Editions
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 5, 2012

"A playful game of matching and silly mismatching. Children will probably figure out how to use this faster than their parents. (iPad bestiary app. 1-3)"
Very simple graphics on two sliding layers give precocious toddlers a chance to assemble a huge menagerie of animal variants and even to create new species. Read full book review >