Search Results: "Stephanie Buscema"


BOOK REVIEW

PUGS IN A BUG by Carolyn Crimi
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 15, 2012

"The pugs driving in the VW bug is a humorous concept, but these puppies needed a stronger plot and some traffic direction to make the story accessible to the intended audience. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Six pugs in a lime-green Volkswagen Beetle take a trip through the countryside and into town, meeting other dogs and vehicles on the way in a confusing, frenetic effort that tries too hard to be clever and bubbly. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NAME THAT DOG! by Peggy Archer
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2010

"Scansion here and in other selections simply twists the tongue, an unfortunate choice for verses intended for preschoolers. (Picture book/poetry. 3-5)"
Bright, colorful, humorous pictures show pups in action and why they received the names they did, from Aspen to Zipper. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MY FIRST GHOST by Maggie Miller
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 7, 2012

"This is a solid choice for sensitive readers, since it provides an alternate, if somewhat sweet story, where ghosts are anything but scary. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Ever wanted a ghost? Answer in the affirmative, and this fictional handbook should offer all the expert advice needed to make sure "your ghost will haunt you forever." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SUPER BUNNY by Stephanie Blake
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2015

"Underwhelming. (Picture book. 3-5)"
Super Bunny wields a pink gun and wears a cape and mask as he sniffs out villains. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE QUIET PIRATE by Stephanie Thatcher
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 1, 2016

"Beleaguered introverts may give a hearty cheer, but neither the art nor the writing is particularly seaworthy. (Picture book. 6-8)"
Even if the meek don't end up inheriting the Earth, sometimes they can bag a pirate ship. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TOY FAIRY by Stephanie Thatcher
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2016

"A fairy tale that's more morality than magic. (Picture book. 3-6)"
What to do when a boy won't clean his room? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LITTLE FOX IN THE FOREST by Stephanie Graegin
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 28, 2017

"A wordless picture book that makes a great read. (Picture book. 3-7)"
A small child, a fox, and the deep forest: not a grim tale at all but rather a magical journey culminating in an act of mutual kindness. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A DEAL'S A DEAL by Stephanie Blake
ANIMALS
Released: July 26, 2011

"While Blake's vibrantly colored, childlike pictures are appealing, the text lacks a certain je ne sais quois. (Picture book. 3-5)"
Blake follows her first picture book about Simon the Super Rabbit, I Don't Want to Go to School (2009), with a disappointingly underdeveloped story about two friends and their toys. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TROUBLE IS A FRIEND OF MINE by Stephanie Tromly
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Aug. 4, 2015

"Despite some flaws, an offbeat and entertaining caper. (Mystery. 13-18)"
A jaded teen's life takes an exciting turn after a new friend ropes her into his investigation of a local kidnapping. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HIDEOUS LOVE by Stephanie Hemphill
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Oct. 1, 2013

"A bleak but riveting portrait of the artist as a young woman. (author's note, biographical notes, Shelley bibliography, suggested reading) (Poetry. 13 & up.)"
A fictionalized verse biography of the tortured genius behind Frankenstein. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KAT, INCORRIGIBLE by Stephanie Burgis
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: April 5, 2011

"Enjoyable mayhem ensues. (Historical fantasy. 10 & up)"
Romance, humor and magic mark this brisk debut novel, the first of a trilogy set in an alternative Regency England. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

POETRY
Released: March 13, 2007

"A must for any young-adult reader of poetry or Plath. (Fiction/poetry. 12+)"
Perhaps at this literary juncture, where novelists supply bibliographies for their fiction and memoirists fictionalize to liberate certain "truths" and dramatize their memories, a "verse portrait" seems entirely in order. Read full book review >