Search Results: "Stephen Alford"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 13, 2012

"A great spy novel—except that it's all true."
Alford (History/Cambridge Univ.; Burghley: William Cecil at the Court of Elizabeth I, 2008, etc.) is an expert on all things Elizabethan, and his intimate knowledge of the queen's ministers and the period's political history guarantees the accuracy and thoroughness of this rip-roaring story. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 1994

"These one-liner sideshows are an acquired taste, but at his best—which can be good indeed—Alford offers genuinely rueful takes on comic aspects of the urban experience."
The journalistic equivalent of a performance artist, Alford dreams up antic minidramas in which he can play at least a supporting role, stages them, and then reviews the results. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I CAN'T BELIEVE I HAVE TO DO THIS by Jan Alford
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 13, 1997

"It's not entirely a tale of woe: Dean wins a student council seat, has a first date, and gains more wholesome friends, but some readers will wilt under the barrage of lessons. (Fiction. 10-12)"
A 12-year-old gets a tutorial in the consequences of irresponsible behavior and the dangers of bad company in this earnestly cautionary novel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 2, 2009

"Bumpy but rich with surprises."
New Yorker contributor Alford (Big Kiss: One Actor's Desperate Attempt to Claw His Way to the Top, 2000, etc.), who is also a contributing editor for Vanity Fair, braids interviews with personal vignettes in his search for the meaning of life. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 8, 2012

"Voyeuristic and occasionally fascinating."
Kiss-and-tell memoir about the author's affair with President John F. Kennedy, beginning when she was a White House intern in 1962. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 3, 2012

"Alford is a razory-wicked, fun guy to be around, and each of his stories are like those 'tiny acts of grace' brightening your day."
Alford (How to Live: A Search for Wisdom from Old People (While They Are Still on This Earth), 2009, etc.) embarks on an idiosyncratic excursion into the land of civility. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FORTUNE'S FOOL by Terry Alford
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 2, 2015

"Alford paints some intriguing shades of gray in this elucidating portrait."
The "first full-length biography" of Abraham Lincoln's assassin offers much nuance and complexity to the killer, bordering on the downright sympathetic. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1994

"While victory and spoils historically go hand in hand, our perception of American Army heroes bringing goodwill and safety in the Nazis' wake is altered by this testament to the dishonesty and greed of a few no-good men."
Alford's fascinating unraveling of an Army cover-up reveals many American WW II soldiers to be not the great liberators, but the great looters of Europe. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ALPHABET SCHOOL by Stephen Johnson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 8, 2015

"Not only does Johnson once again take something simple and make it extraordinary, but he will inspire readers to do the same. (Alphabet book. 4-8)"
The multiple-award-winning illustrator takes a page from his own book—Alphabet City (1995), that is—and creates a graphic-alphabet book that will have students searching their own schools for letters. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE THREE TRICERATOPS TUFF by Stephen Shaskan
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 2, 2013

"Dino lovers will be charmed; others may want to stick with the more traditional goats, like those of Mary Finch's 2001 title. (Fractured fairy tale. 3-7)"
This version of "The Three Billy Goats Gruff" will satisfy dinosaur lovers who just cannot get their fill of their favorite prehistoric beasts. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAL AND CHAD by Stephen McCranie
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 19, 2012

"Some readers will come for the heartbreak, others will come for the forest of cupcake trees, but everyone will be cheered by the happy ending, which involves the 'biggest, bestest bark ever!' (Graphic novel. 8-11)"
There are some literary characters you wish were real, so that you could be friends with them, and Mal and Chad may belong on that list. Read full book review >