Search Results: "Stephen C. Bird"


BOOK REVIEW

Any Resemblance To A Coincidence Is Accidental by Stephen C. Bird
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 16, 2015

"An offbeat work of carnivalesque proportions, populated by zany, outspoken, and eccentric personalities."
An ambitious book offers an amalgam of opinion, satire, and character sketch. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 16, 2012

"This raucous avant-garde comedy will sweep you along with its vigor and originality."
Lurid satirical riffs hold up a fun-house mirror to the world in this fantasia. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Hideous Exuberance by Stephen C. Bird
Released: Jan. 31, 2013

"Fast-paced, lewd and extremely unconventional short stories that may appeal to fans of Mark Danielewski and David Foster Wallace."
A collection of hyperenergetic, scatological, stream-of-consciousness short stories. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TIME’S EYE by Arthur C. Clarke
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Jan. 1, 2004

"Curiously sloppy, with biographical contradictions and a rationale that's inconsistently applied: despite the many echoes of 2001, more spectacle than substance."
Second collaborative effort (The Light of Other Days, 2000) from these two individually famous authors, and first of a two-book series exploring the manipulation of time. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LIGHT OF OTHER DAYS by Arthur C. Clarke
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 24, 2000

"Often chaotic but fizzing with ideas: one of those rare books you wish had been longer, with a more thorough exploration of the many fascinating issues it raises. ($250,000 ad/promo)"
This first collaborative effort from Clarke, the venerable author of 3001: The Final Odyssey (1997), etc., and the up-and-coming Baxter (Manifold: Time, Jan. 2000, etc.), exploits an old SF idea: a device that allows anyone to spy on anyone else, anywhere…and anytime. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 15, 1992

"A clear explanation of AIDS as an epidemic, and a forceful presentation of controversial proposals for dealing with it."
A cool, scientific overview of the AIDS epidemic, combined with a passionate defense of his own battle to protect public health, from a former N.Y.C. Health Commissioner. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ATOM by Stephen C. Sutcliffe
Released: Feb. 28, 2002

"An ambitious but awkwardly executed thriller."
In Sutcliffe's debut novel, spoiled rich kids take nuclear Armageddon into their own hands. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MY SECOND LIFE by Faye Bird
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 19, 2016

"A page-turning mystery with a spot-on emotional core. (author's note) (Mystery. 14 & up)"
A teen living her second life is haunted by having killed someone in her first. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FUNNY GIRL by Betsy Bird
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 9, 2017

"Whether these live up to the subtitle's claim of 'funniest stories ever' is subjective, but the lighthearted array will surely appeal to a wide audience. (Anthology. 9-13)"
The 28 short stories, autobiographical essays, and comic strips in this entertaining anthology are meant to prove that females can be funny, and they succeed. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 1, 2010

"A compelling but scattered study that requires a patient, highly engaged reader."
A complicated, ambitious survey of the Zanzibar dynasty and the scourge of the Arab slave trade in Africa. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 13, 2001

"Written with precision, this sincere (though somewhat uneventful) account offers the reader a glimpse of an Iran rarely seen in the news."
A travelogue in which Bird (The Jazz and Blues Lover's Guide to the US, not reviewed) successfully unpeels the many layers behind the opaque veneer of Iran. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 1992

"Despite a paucity of personal detail, the absorbing text (ten years in preparation) will likely be the definitive life story for decades to come."
In a 1962 spoof for Esquire, Richard Rovere quoted John Kenneth Galbraith as deeming John J. McCloy ``chairman of the US Establishment''—but McCloy has never been the subject of a full- dress biography. Read full book review >